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The Best Australian Poetry series - publisher  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003-... 2003- The Best Australian Poetry
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Annual selection of poems published in Australian literary journals and newspapers.

Includes

y separately published work icon The Best Australian Poetry 2003 Martin Duwell (editor), Bronwyn Lea (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2003 Z1064350 2003 anthology poetry Selection of forty-one poems published in Australian literary journals and newspapers during 2002. Contributors' notes, pp.97-111, include authors' comments on individual poems. St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2003
y separately published work icon The Best Australian Poetry 2004 Anthony Lawrence (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2004 Z1145160 2004 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) Selection of poems published in Australian literary journals and newspapers during 2003. Contributors' notes, pp.103-127, include authors' comments on individual poems. St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2004
y separately published work icon The Best Australian Poetry 2005 Peter Porter (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2005 Z1219041 2005 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2005
y separately published work icon The Best Australian Poetry 2006 Judith Beveridge (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2006 Z1304971 2006 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units)

'In making her selection of the best 40 poems from Australia’s literary journals, Beveridge – one of Australia’s leading poets – has searched for poems that enact ‘a serious showdown between the word and the poet’. Passionate, vigorous and filled with visitations and mysterious narratives, The Best Australian Poetry 2006 is the liveliest gathering of Australian poetry. '  (Publication summary)

St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2006
y separately published work icon The Best Australian Poetry 2007 John Tranter (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2007 Z1423275 2007 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2007
y separately published work icon The Best Australian Poetry 2008 David Brooks (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2008 Z1537239 2008 anthology poetry (taught in 3 units)

'His selection of 40 poems from Australia's print and online journals captures a sense of poetry as passion, as lived experience, and momentary distillations into action.' (Source: Publisher's website)

St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2008
y separately published work icon The Best Australian Poetry 2009 Alan Wearne (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2009 Z1626831 2009 anthology poetry (taught in 2 units)

'The Best Australian Poetry 2009 celebrates the originality and verve of Australian poetry at this moment. In this collection of 40 poems Alan Wearne brings long experience as a poet and teacher of poetry, and a sharp eye for the surprising. Bookended with an introduction by Wearne and the poets' commentary on their work, this year's collection is a sophisticated and accessible sampling of recent achievements in Australian poetry.' (From the publisher's website.)

Biographical notes on the contributing poets are included, together with a substantial comment by each poet their selected poem.

St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2009

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

They Will Oxidise Before You Even Finish Reading Kent MacCarter , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland , Winter vol. 227 no. 2017; (p. 18-23)

'Einstein’s theory of general relativity states that matter can cataclysmically implode, creating a state where a given density and the space-time curvature split towards infinite values. This is referred to as a singularity, or – as it is known to ordinary folk – a black hole. Extending out from a black hole’s unfathomably dense centre and extraordinary gravitational pull is a finite volume of space that ends in an event horizon: a demarcation – a line in the cosmic sands – from which nothing inside can escape: not rock, metal, Judas Priest, photons, alliteration or anything else. The closer that matter gets to a singularity, the more the laws of physics fail, eventually collapsing entirely.'  (Introduction)

Collecting the Contemporary : Australian Poetry Anthologies in the 'Noughties' Cameron Fuller , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Poems in Perspex : Max Harris Poetry Award 2007 2008; (p. 112-118)
Collecting the Contemporary : Australian Poetry Anthologies in the 'Noughties' Cameron Fuller , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Poems in Perspex : Max Harris Poetry Award 2007 2008; (p. 112-118)
They Will Oxidise Before You Even Finish Reading Kent MacCarter , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland , Winter vol. 227 no. 2017; (p. 18-23)

'Einstein’s theory of general relativity states that matter can cataclysmically implode, creating a state where a given density and the space-time curvature split towards infinite values. This is referred to as a singularity, or – as it is known to ordinary folk – a black hole. Extending out from a black hole’s unfathomably dense centre and extraordinary gravitational pull is a finite volume of space that ends in an event horizon: a demarcation – a line in the cosmic sands – from which nothing inside can escape: not rock, metal, Judas Priest, photons, alliteration or anything else. The closer that matter gets to a singularity, the more the laws of physics fail, eventually collapsing entirely.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 17 Nov 2003 12:57:05
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