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The Desolate Homestead single work   short story   romance  
  • Author:agent Hal
Issue Details: First known date: 1866... 1866 The Desolate Homestead
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Romantic tragedy. A young Englishman establishes a house for his youthful bride only to discover that she has been seduced on the ship out and has fled with her lover. The husband watches over her and when she is cast off provides her with the home he has prepared but he leaves. She dies of sorrow, and, several years after, having returned to England to prevent the marriage of her seducer, he dies too. Well told. (PB)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Australian Journal vol. 2 no. 54 8 September 1866 Z1058733 1866 periodical issue 1866 pg. 21-24
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Anthology of Colonial Australian Romance Fiction Ken Gelder (editor), Rachael Weaver (editor), Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 2010 Z1683333 2010 anthology short story extract romance (taught in 5 units)

    'The Anthology of Colonial Australian Romance Fiction collects captivating stories of love and passion, longing and regret. In these tales women arriving in the New World make decisions about relationships and marriage, social conventions, finances and career-and even the future of the nation itself. The "slim and graceful" Australian girl becomes a new character type: independent, self-possessed and full of promise. These stories also show women gaining experience about the world, and the men, around them. They are put to the test by a new life and a new place. And not every relationship works out well.

    The best of colonial Australian romance fiction is collected in this anthology, from writers such as Ada Cambridge, Rosa Praed, Francis Adams, Henry Lawson, Mura Leigh and many others.' (From the publisher's website.)

    Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 2010
    pg. 13-27

Works about this Work

'We Have to Learn to Love Imperially' : Love in Late Colonial and Federation Australian Romance Novels Hsu-Ming Teo , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Popular Romance Studies , vol. 4 no. 2 2014;

'This article explores Australian romance fiction from the 1880s to 1930s to contemplate how Australian women writers conceptualized romantic love, gender relations, marriage, and the role of the romantic couple within the nation and British Empire. It argues that short stories about love and romance novels prior to Australian Federation (1901) tended to be more pessimistic about the outcome of romantic love in the colonies; both male and female writers of love stories were too aware of the hardships that befell women in the colonies, especially along the frontier. After Federation, however, many of the obstacles to love that had developed in the colonial romance persisted, but in the post-Federation romance novel women writers began to imagine that Australian culture, environment, and character – particularly the two heroic national types, the “Australian Girl” and the “Coming Man” – were ultimately sufficient to overcome such obstacles. Thus post-Federation romance novels are more likely to have happy endings. In these romances, a successful marriage between an Australian and a Briton also served the higher purpose of either nation- or empire-building.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

'We Have to Learn to Love Imperially' : Love in Late Colonial and Federation Australian Romance Novels Hsu-Ming Teo , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Popular Romance Studies , vol. 4 no. 2 2014;

'This article explores Australian romance fiction from the 1880s to 1930s to contemplate how Australian women writers conceptualized romantic love, gender relations, marriage, and the role of the romantic couple within the nation and British Empire. It argues that short stories about love and romance novels prior to Australian Federation (1901) tended to be more pessimistic about the outcome of romantic love in the colonies; both male and female writers of love stories were too aware of the hardships that befell women in the colonies, especially along the frontier. After Federation, however, many of the obstacles to love that had developed in the colonial romance persisted, but in the post-Federation romance novel women writers began to imagine that Australian culture, environment, and character – particularly the two heroic national types, the “Australian Girl” and the “Coming Man” – were ultimately sufficient to overcome such obstacles. Thus post-Federation romance novels are more likely to have happy endings. In these romances, a successful marriage between an Australian and a Briton also served the higher purpose of either nation- or empire-building.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Last amended 21 May 2010 11:12:02
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