AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 3572278738700440818.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y separately published work icon Teacher's Pet single work   children's fiction   children's   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 Teacher's Pet
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Ginger is allergic to cats. And possibly to her family as well. She's also not keen on the cat food in her breakfast bowl or the school principal trying to kill her best friend. The question on everyone's lips is – will Ginger snap?'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Puffin , 2003 .
      image of person or book cover 3572278738700440818.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 190p.
      ISBN: 0140387994
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Puffin ,
      2004 .
      image of person or book cover 2645352221048353335.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 190p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 8 January 2004.
      ISBN: 0141317558, 9780141317557
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Puffin , 2015 .
      image of person or book cover 6328543611542955741.jpg
      Extent: 208p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 26 August 2015.
      ISBN: 9780143308911 (pbk)
Alternative title: 小淘氣晶晶
Transliterated title: Xiao tao qi Jingjing
Language: Chinese

Other Formats

Works about this Work

Subversion or Socialization? : Humour and Carnival in Morris Gleitzman's Texts Kathryn James , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature in Education , December vol. 35 no. 4 2004; (p. 367-379)
"Like their counterparts elsewhere, Australian children favour humorous novels; comedic writers consistently dominate the preteen and early teen fiction market in Australia. Regardless of its popularity, however, in comparison to more serious writing, humorous literature has received little critical attention. Of the studies aimed at this area, most have tended to concentrate on the various stages of development in childrens preferences for humor, its strategies, forms and appeal, with very few examining the ideological assumptions informing particular texts. Yet, this article argues, humorous books are no less concerned with culture, value and meaning than any other kind of fiction for children. As Morris Gleitzmans texts illustrate, by highlighting the cultural processes involved in the construction of language and meaning, inviting readers to play with ideas about language, social roles and behaviors, and creating characters who act in ways which are oppositional to usual socializing expectations, humorous literature, especially in carnivalized forms, has the potential to problematize unquestioning acceptance of various ideological para-digms, values, social practices and rules."
[Review] Teachers Pet Michael O'Donoghue , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 47 no. 4 2003; (p. 27)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
Book Reviews Isaac Lloyd , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 15 July 2003; (p. 4)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
[Review] Teachers Pet Russ Merrin , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 18 no. 3 2003; (p. 34)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
Just for Fun Rod Moran , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 21 June 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
For Kids Dianne Dempsey , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 17 May 2003; (p. 6)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
Just for Fun Rod Moran , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 21 June 2003; (p. 15)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
[Review] Teachers Pet Russ Merrin , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 18 no. 3 2003; (p. 34)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
Book Reviews Isaac Lloyd , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 15 July 2003; (p. 4)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
[Review] Teachers Pet Michael O'Donoghue , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 47 no. 4 2003; (p. 27)

— Review of Teacher's Pet Morris Gleitzman , 2003 single work children's fiction
Subversion or Socialization? : Humour and Carnival in Morris Gleitzman's Texts Kathryn James , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature in Education , December vol. 35 no. 4 2004; (p. 367-379)
"Like their counterparts elsewhere, Australian children favour humorous novels; comedic writers consistently dominate the preteen and early teen fiction market in Australia. Regardless of its popularity, however, in comparison to more serious writing, humorous literature has received little critical attention. Of the studies aimed at this area, most have tended to concentrate on the various stages of development in childrens preferences for humor, its strategies, forms and appeal, with very few examining the ideological assumptions informing particular texts. Yet, this article argues, humorous books are no less concerned with culture, value and meaning than any other kind of fiction for children. As Morris Gleitzmans texts illustrate, by highlighting the cultural processes involved in the construction of language and meaning, inviting readers to play with ideas about language, social roles and behaviors, and creating characters who act in ways which are oppositional to usual socializing expectations, humorous literature, especially in carnivalized forms, has the potential to problematize unquestioning acceptance of various ideological para-digms, values, social practices and rules."
Last amended 19 Jun 2020 11:49:37
X