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y separately published work icon Bring the Monkey : A Light Novel single work   novel   satire  
Issue Details: First known date: 1933... 1933 Bring the Monkey : A Light Novel
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This work, which she sub-titles 'a light novel' is an English mystery story, revolving round a theft of jewels and a murder at 'Tattingwood Hall.' It is something more than a mystery story, however, and might be as aptly described as a highly amusing and clever satire on certain aspects of modern English and American social life, in which a wealthy film artist with an avid love of publicity and an amateur aviator's craze of flying stunts are satirised with rare subtlety. The part which a monkey plays in the story gives it a bizarre flavour and heightens the entertainment of the author's spicy narrative.'

Source:

'Recent Fiction', The West Australian, 10 June 1933, p.4.

Notes

  • Some editions published without the subtitle.
  • Available as sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Endeavour Press , 1933 .
      image of person or book cover 2317497041814107880.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 245p.
      Description: illus.
    • St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,: University of Queensland Press , 1984 .
      image of person or book cover 6025787431062524246.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xvii, 245p.p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Introduced by Bronwen Levy.
      ISBN: 0702218170, 070221809X (pbk)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Pandora ,
      1987 .
      image of person or book cover 1393240759257436572.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xvi, 174 p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduced by Bronwen Levy.
      ISBN: 0863581994 (pbk)

Works about this Work

Collecting the Criminal : Murder and Mayhem in Cultural Institutions Rachel Franks , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , 1 March vol. 7 no. 1 2018; (p. 41-58)
‘There’s a Dead Body in My Library’ : Crime Fiction Texts and the History of Libraries Rachel Franks , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Library Journal , vol. 64 no. 4 2015; (p. 288-300)
'Since the publication of Australia’s first crime novel in 1830, Australians have read crime fiction for entertainment, for the reassurance that wrongdoers will be punished, and to test their deductive skills against those of their favourite sleuth. The novels, short stories and plays within the crime fiction genre that have been produced in Australia between colonial times and the present day also offer opportunities to investigate a particular place or a particular time. Indeed, many crime fiction writers have mastered the art of recreating settings in both rural and metropolitan landscapes. The details provided within these works ultimately reveal a culprit (usually a murderer), yet they also outline the availability of certain products, bus and train timetables, the floor plans of local hotels or world-famous buildings and numerous other particulars, thus providing a rich, if surprising, source of material for the merely curious and the professional researcher. Crime fiction stories set within libraries present a history of the information services profession. This paper demonstrates how crime fiction can provide an important supplement to more traditional historical sources, with a focus on how the genre has documented some of the major changes within libraries over the last 75 years, since 1939.' (Publication abstract)
Gendering the Genre : Three Australian Women Writers and their Debut Crime Fiction Novels Rachel Franks , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , March vol. 3 no. 1 2014; (p. 57-71)
'The creators and consumers of crime fiction have changed dramatically since the genre, established in ancient times to define legal and moral codes and indicate the consequences for breaking those codes, first started to gain widespread popularity as a form of entertainment in the eighteenth century. One of the most significant of these changes can be seen in the slow but steady rise of the female as consumer, creator and character. There are many ways to explore some of the gendered changes within the crime fiction genre, one of which is to examine novels written by women who have chosen female protagonists to tell their stories. Ostensibly quite different texts, Miles Franklin’s Bring the Monkey (1933), June Wright’s Murder in the Telephone Exchange (1948) and Elizabeth Antill’s Death on the Barrier Reef (1952) are three debut crime novels that share some striking similarities. In addition to all three novels featuring female first-person narrators, these stories also tell tales of very violent crimes and contribute to documenting some of the shifts in views on gender, female friendship, marriage and class within what has become the world’s most popular genre.' (Publication abstract)
Stella Miles Franklin (1879-1954) and Rose Scott (1847-1925) : Visionaries Who Demanded Change to the Role of Women Susanna De Vries , 2002 single work biography
— Appears in: Great Australian Women : Volume 2 - From Pioneering Days to the Present 2002; (p. 100-174)
Miles Franklin's Bring the Monkey Sanjay Sircar , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Clues : A Journal of Detection , vol. 15 no. 2 1994; (p. 15-37)
A Reader's Notebook: New Australian Work Nettie Palmer , 1933 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 15 May vol. 5 no. 5 1933; (p. 69-70)

— Review of The Animals Noah Forgot A. B. Paterson , 1933 selected work poetry ; In the Wake of the Bounty : To Tahiti and Pitcairn Island Charles Chauvel , 1933 single work ; 'Mordecaius' Overture : A Poem Bertram Higgins , 1933 single work poetry ; Jonah Louis Stone , 1911 single work novel ; Bring the Monkey : A Light Novel Miles Franklin , 1933 single work novel
A Reader's Notebook Nettie Palmer , 1933 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 10 June vol. 5 no. 6 1933; (p. 87)

— Review of Bring the Monkey : A Light Novel Miles Franklin , 1933 single work novel ; Quartette Leslie Meller , 1932 single work novel ; A Leaf of Laurel : A Novel Leslie Meller , 1933 single work novel ; Among the Reeds 'Jane Laker' , 1933 single work novel ; Pageant G. B. Lancaster , 1933 single work novel
Some Australian Books for Christmas Nettie Palmer , 1933 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 4 December vol. 5 no. 12 1933; (p. 203, 205, 207)

— Review of Chris Brennan Alfred George Stephens , 1933 single work criticism biography ; The Brooks of Morning : Nature and Reflective Essays Donald MacDonald , 1933 selected work prose ; Australian Barkers and Biters Robert Kaleski , 1914 selected work short story essay ; Drums of Mer Ion L. Idriess , 1933 single work novel ; The Gallant Company : An Australian Soldier's Story of 1915-18 Williams H. R. , 1933 single work autobiography ; The Man from Oodnadatta R. B. Plowman , 1933 selected work short story autobiography ; Nought So Very Wise : Verses Ethel Davies , 1932 selected work poetry ; Wardens of the Seas : Poems E. J. Brady , 1933 selected work poetry ; 'Mordecaius' Overture : A Poem Bertram Higgins , 1933 single work poetry ; Youth Builds A Monument 'J. Leslie' , 1933 single work novel ; Money Street John K. Ewers , 1933 single work novel ; Bring the Monkey : A Light Novel Miles Franklin , 1933 single work novel ; She Dresses for Dinner Georgia Rivers , 1933 single work novel ; Pageant G. B. Lancaster , 1933 single work novel ; Teens Triumphant Louise Mack , 1933 single work novel ; Desert Saga 'William Hatfield' , 1933 single work novel ; Lost Dale Collins , 1933 single work novel ; Here Comes the King Philip Lindsay , 1933 single work novel ; The Woman on the Beast : Viewed from Three Angles Helen Simpson , 1933 single work novel
Untitled Freda Barrymore , 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 24 June 1933; (p. 24)

— Review of Bring the Monkey : A Light Novel Miles Franklin , 1933 single work novel
Mystery and B.Y.T.'s 1933 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 May vol. 54 no. 2780 1933; (p. 2)

— Review of Bring the Monkey : A Light Novel Miles Franklin , 1933 single work novel
Miles Franklin's Bring the Monkey Sanjay Sircar , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Clues : A Journal of Detection , vol. 15 no. 2 1994; (p. 15-37)
Stella Miles Franklin (1879-1954) and Rose Scott (1847-1925) : Visionaries Who Demanded Change to the Role of Women Susanna De Vries , 2002 single work biography
— Appears in: Great Australian Women : Volume 2 - From Pioneering Days to the Present 2002; (p. 100-174)
Gendering the Genre : Three Australian Women Writers and their Debut Crime Fiction Novels Rachel Franks , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , March vol. 3 no. 1 2014; (p. 57-71)
'The creators and consumers of crime fiction have changed dramatically since the genre, established in ancient times to define legal and moral codes and indicate the consequences for breaking those codes, first started to gain widespread popularity as a form of entertainment in the eighteenth century. One of the most significant of these changes can be seen in the slow but steady rise of the female as consumer, creator and character. There are many ways to explore some of the gendered changes within the crime fiction genre, one of which is to examine novels written by women who have chosen female protagonists to tell their stories. Ostensibly quite different texts, Miles Franklin’s Bring the Monkey (1933), June Wright’s Murder in the Telephone Exchange (1948) and Elizabeth Antill’s Death on the Barrier Reef (1952) are three debut crime novels that share some striking similarities. In addition to all three novels featuring female first-person narrators, these stories also tell tales of very violent crimes and contribute to documenting some of the shifts in views on gender, female friendship, marriage and class within what has become the world’s most popular genre.' (Publication abstract)
‘There’s a Dead Body in My Library’ : Crime Fiction Texts and the History of Libraries Rachel Franks , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Library Journal , vol. 64 no. 4 2015; (p. 288-300)
'Since the publication of Australia’s first crime novel in 1830, Australians have read crime fiction for entertainment, for the reassurance that wrongdoers will be punished, and to test their deductive skills against those of their favourite sleuth. The novels, short stories and plays within the crime fiction genre that have been produced in Australia between colonial times and the present day also offer opportunities to investigate a particular place or a particular time. Indeed, many crime fiction writers have mastered the art of recreating settings in both rural and metropolitan landscapes. The details provided within these works ultimately reveal a culprit (usually a murderer), yet they also outline the availability of certain products, bus and train timetables, the floor plans of local hotels or world-famous buildings and numerous other particulars, thus providing a rich, if surprising, source of material for the merely curious and the professional researcher. Crime fiction stories set within libraries present a history of the information services profession. This paper demonstrates how crime fiction can provide an important supplement to more traditional historical sources, with a focus on how the genre has documented some of the major changes within libraries over the last 75 years, since 1939.' (Publication abstract)
Collecting the Criminal : Murder and Mayhem in Cultural Institutions Rachel Franks , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , 1 March vol. 7 no. 1 2018; (p. 41-58)
Last amended 20 Apr 2015 16:24:18
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