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y separately published work icon Candles at Dawn single work   novel   young adult  
First known date: 1997 Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 Candles at Dawn
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Told from a Turkish perspective, this novel relates the story of two teenage girls, one from Australia and one from Turkey, who meet and become friends. They discover that their grandfathers had fought on opposite sides at Gallipoli.

Exhibitions

14233763
14232866

Notes

  • Translated from the original 1997 Turkish publication.
    While in manuscript form, this novel won a Turkish literary award.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it is set in the Middle East.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Language: English
    • Ankara,
      c
      Turkey,
      c
      Middle East, Asia,
      :
      Guldikeni Yayinlari ,
      2000 .
      image of person or book cover 3731563934021721152.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 152p.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliographical references.
      ISBN: 97567731036
    • Balmain, Glebe - Leichhardt - Balmain area, Sydney Inner West, Sydney, New South Wales,: Limelight Press , 2004 .
      Extent: 158p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 0957935277

Works about this Work

Ruins or Foundations : Great War Literature in the Australian Curriculum Clare Rhoden , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'The Great War has been represented in Australian curricula since 1914, in texts with tones ranging from bellicose patriotism to idealistic pacifism. Australian curricula have included war literature as one way of transmitting cultural values, values that continue to evolve as successive generations relate differently to war and peace. Changes in ethical perspectives and popular feeling have guided text selection and pedagogy, so that texts which were once accepted as foundational to Australian society seem, at later times, to document civilisation's ruin.

In recent years, overseas texts have been preferred above Australian examples as mediators of the Great War, an event still held by many to be of essential importance to Australia. This paper first considers arguments for including Great War texts on the national curriculum, exploring what war literature can, and cannot, be expected to bring to the program. Interrogating the purpose/s of war literature in the curriculum and the ways in which the texts may be used to meet such expectations, the paper then discusses styles of war texts and investigates whether there is a case for including more texts by Australian authors.' (Author's abstract)
An Awfully Big Adventure : Killing Death in War Stories for Children Alison Halliday , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 90-95)
Halliday locates a gap in Kerry Mallan's study concerning discourses of death and dying in children's literature, and claims, 'A curious omission is death in war, from the legal killing of and by soldiers, to the horror underlying the euphemism of 'collateral damage'' (90). Halliday suggests that despite a 'proliferation of discourses [on the] manifestations of death... there is a lingering taboo in dealing with death in war stories, especially for older readers' (90). The essay refers to some of the strategies and narrative techniques used to represent war in children's fiction from an array of novels, including several Australian children's texts by contemporary authors, Morris Gleitzman, Sonya Hartnett, Anthony Eaton, Serpil Ural and David Metzenthen. Strategies discussed include discourses of hope, the use of metaphor, reader-subject positioning and setting with Halliday concluding that, 'When death is present and brutally explicit...cultural pressures about the appropriateness of reading material and consequent censorship occur' (94).
Untitled Bronwyn Fryar , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 48 no. 2 2004; (p. 26)

— Review of Candles at Dawn Serpil Ural , 1997 single work novel
Young Readers Robin Morrow , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12-13 June 2004; (p. 15)

— Review of Dark Dreams : Australian Refugee Stories 2004 anthology autobiography biography essay poetry ; Candles at Dawn Serpil Ural , 1997 single work novel
Faces of War Expose Our Moral Dilemma Tony Stephens , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24-25 April 2004; (p. 10-11)

— Review of Candles at Dawn Serpil Ural , 1997 single work novel
Faces of War Expose Our Moral Dilemma Tony Stephens , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24-25 April 2004; (p. 10-11)

— Review of Candles at Dawn Serpil Ural , 1997 single work novel
Young Readers Robin Morrow , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12-13 June 2004; (p. 15)

— Review of Dark Dreams : Australian Refugee Stories 2004 anthology autobiography biography essay poetry ; Candles at Dawn Serpil Ural , 1997 single work novel
Untitled Bronwyn Fryar , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 48 no. 2 2004; (p. 26)

— Review of Candles at Dawn Serpil Ural , 1997 single work novel
Gallipoli Book Spreads Message of Peace Jennifer Moran , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 9 April 2003; (p. 6)
An Awfully Big Adventure : Killing Death in War Stories for Children Alison Halliday , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 90-95)
Halliday locates a gap in Kerry Mallan's study concerning discourses of death and dying in children's literature, and claims, 'A curious omission is death in war, from the legal killing of and by soldiers, to the horror underlying the euphemism of 'collateral damage'' (90). Halliday suggests that despite a 'proliferation of discourses [on the] manifestations of death... there is a lingering taboo in dealing with death in war stories, especially for older readers' (90). The essay refers to some of the strategies and narrative techniques used to represent war in children's fiction from an array of novels, including several Australian children's texts by contemporary authors, Morris Gleitzman, Sonya Hartnett, Anthony Eaton, Serpil Ural and David Metzenthen. Strategies discussed include discourses of hope, the use of metaphor, reader-subject positioning and setting with Halliday concluding that, 'When death is present and brutally explicit...cultural pressures about the appropriateness of reading material and consequent censorship occur' (94).
No-Man's-Land Has Two Sides : A View for Children of Gallipoli, 1915, from the Turkish and Australian Trenches John Foster , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 41 no. 4 2003; (p. 21-27)
Examines books dealing with the same campaign, reflecting the feelings of people whose ancestors fought that battle nearly ninety years ago
Ruins or Foundations : Great War Literature in the Australian Curriculum Clare Rhoden , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'The Great War has been represented in Australian curricula since 1914, in texts with tones ranging from bellicose patriotism to idealistic pacifism. Australian curricula have included war literature as one way of transmitting cultural values, values that continue to evolve as successive generations relate differently to war and peace. Changes in ethical perspectives and popular feeling have guided text selection and pedagogy, so that texts which were once accepted as foundational to Australian society seem, at later times, to document civilisation's ruin.

In recent years, overseas texts have been preferred above Australian examples as mediators of the Great War, an event still held by many to be of essential importance to Australia. This paper first considers arguments for including Great War texts on the national curriculum, exploring what war literature can, and cannot, be expected to bring to the program. Interrogating the purpose/s of war literature in the curriculum and the ways in which the texts may be used to meet such expectations, the paper then discusses styles of war texts and investigates whether there is a case for including more texts by Australian authors.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 2 Jul 2014 14:05:32
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