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Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000 Talkin' Up to the White Woman : Aboriginal Women and Feminism
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

In this important and beautifully written book, Aileen Moreton-Robinson gives us a compelling analysis of white Australian feminism seen through Indigenous Australian women's eyes. She unpacks the unspoken normative subject of feminism as white middle-class woman, where whitemess marks their position of power and privilege vis-a-vis Indigenous women, and where silence about whitemess sustains the exercise of that power. And she examines the consequences of practices for Indigenous women and White women.' (Source: Preface, Talkin' Up to the White Women, 2000)

Exhibitions

7616736

Notes

  • Dedication:

    For the warrior women of Quandamooka

    especially my nan Lavinia Moreton (1905-1989)

    my mum Joan Moreton and my daughter

    Rhiannon Moreton-Tobinson

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Dear Miss Spence : An Open Letter to Catherine Helen Spence (1825–1910) Dee Mitchell , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Life Writing , vol. 13 no. 4 2016;

'Inspired by Aileen Moreton-Robinson's Talkin’ Up to the White Woman, in this reflection on the beginnings of foster care in Australia I talk back to a dead white woman, Catherine Helen Spence, and argue that she should no longer be honoured for her role in the nascent system because of the classism at the heart of it.' (Introduction)

Metapolitics vs. Identity Politics : (Re-)Radicalising the Postcolonial Penelope Pitt-Alizadeh , Ali Alizadeh , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 73 no. 1 2013; (p. 57-74)

'Postcolonialism may be defined as a theoretical framework for reading and appreciating cultural production between normative Western "forms of social explanation" and "more complex cultural and political boundaries" that demarcate responses to this normativity (Bhabha 248) As such, this framework has been extremely beneficial for, among other things, introducing and highlighting the work of writers from non-Western cultural backgrounds, particularly Indigenous and multicultural or diasporic writers whose works convey conceptual and aesthetic themes and values at once foreign and responsive to Western European literary modalities. Thanks to postcolonial theory and associated methodologies, a very diverse range of writers from a host of cultural origins and locations has been accepted by and incorporated into most, if not all, Western academic and literary milieus.' (Authors' introduction.)

Animal Handlers : Australian Women Writers on Sexuality and the Female Body Odette Kelada , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms along the Edge , May vol. 26 no. 2012;
'The year 2011 saw the igniting of mass protest around the issue of sexual double standards for women with numerous marches worldwide called 'SlutWalks'. Thousands of women across a range of countries including America, Europe, Britain and Australia took to the streets to defend the right of women to dress and behave freely without stigmatisation and violence. The 'SlutWalks' started in reaction to a local policeman in Toronto telling a class of college students to avoid dressing like 'sluts' if they did not wish to be victimised (SlutWalk Toronto site). The public protest in response to this incident demonstrates resistance to historically embedded discourses that demean women's sexuality and blame women for abuse and rape they suffer. Terms such as 'slut' perpetuate a virgin/whore dichotomy fundamental to the oppression of female sexual self-expression. These marches are a recent example that follows on from a tradition of mass protests for women's sexual equality and right to safety such as 'Reclaim the Night'. Drawing on writing and conversations with poets Dorothy Porter and Gig Ryan, novelists Drusilla Modjeska, Kate Grenville, Carmel Bird and Melissa Lucashenko and playwright, Leah Purcell, this article offers insights into individual creative women's responses to this theme of women's sexuality. I argue that the work and ideas of these women are examples of the unique and powerful dialogue that can happen through a focus on creativity and female stories in Australia.' (Author's introduction)
White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
Anti-Nativism in Australian Indigenous Literature Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kultura Historia Globalizacja , no. 7 2010; (p. 53-64)
'What in today's literary discourse are the reality and the world created by the words: nativism, nativity, the native, native? Why do we still speak and communicate with them and use them in different contexts, even though we know that these words often carry a negative emotional meaning load, taking us to spaces, times, and experiences of colonial suffering, despite their basis in academic arguments. In Australia such issues have been addressed by many Indigenous writers, amongst them — M. Langton, A. Moreton- Robinson, Mudrooroo, C. Watego, T. Birch, F. Bayet — Charlton, to name just a few.' (Author's introduction)
The Velvet Glove Anne Marshall , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 62 no. 2 2002; (p. 187-191)

— Review of Talkin' Up to the White Woman : Aboriginal Women and Feminism Aileen Moreton-Robinson , 2000 single work criticism
Race and Gender in Australia and New Zealand Ceridwen Spark , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Politics and Culture , no. 2 2001;

— Review of Talkin' Up to the White Woman : Aboriginal Women and Feminism Aileen Moreton-Robinson , 2000 single work criticism ; Race, Colour and Identity in Australia and New Zealand 2000 anthology criticism biography ; Belonging : Australians, Place and Aboriginal Ownership Peter Read , 2000 multi chapter work prose
Negotiating Subjectivity : Indigenous Feminist Praxis and the Politics of Aboriginality in Alexis Wright’s Plains of Promise and Melissa Lucashenko’s Steam Pigs Tomoko Ichitani , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 185-202)
Long Marches across the Landscape of Gender Raewyn Connell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , December vol. 25 no. 66 2010; (p. 379-389)
Perpetuating White Australia : Aboriginal Self-Representation, White Editing and Preferred Stereotypes Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Creating White Australia 2009; (p. 156-172)
Complicity, Critique and Methodology: Australian Con/texts Fiona Probyn , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 218-228)
White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
Last amended 20 Feb 2017 16:32:59
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