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Issue Details: First known date: 1996... 1996 Imaginary Bodies : Ethics, Power and Corporeality
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Routledge ,
      1996 .

Works about this Work

Remembering Forgetting : Love-Stories by Nicholas Jose, Simone Lazaroo and Hsu-Ming Teo Lyn Jacobs , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intersections , October no. 8 2002;

Framing her reading by Moira Gatens' examination of difference (in Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality) Jaobs explores the three novels, seeing that in each of them, identity, sexual and familial love, and cross-cultural encounters are interrogated and complicated by an inability to forget the past which over-shadows the business of survival. The refutation of history's domination in these texts represents a powerful re-claiming and re-articulation of identity and individual prerogatives, speaking of reasons to live and love, beyond narrowly prescriptive collectivising narratives of time, people or place.

Remembering Forgetting : Love-Stories by Nicholas Jose, Simone Lazaroo and Hsu-Ming Teo Lyn Jacobs , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intersections , October no. 8 2002;

Framing her reading by Moira Gatens' examination of difference (in Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality) Jaobs explores the three novels, seeing that in each of them, identity, sexual and familial love, and cross-cultural encounters are interrogated and complicated by an inability to forget the past which over-shadows the business of survival. The refutation of history's domination in these texts represents a powerful re-claiming and re-articulation of identity and individual prerogatives, speaking of reasons to live and love, beyond narrowly prescriptive collectivising narratives of time, people or place.

Last amended 29 Oct 2002 11:29:01
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