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Date: 2007-
Date: 2002-2006
Issue Details: First known date: 2002... 2002 Cultural Studies Review
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Volume 12, Issue 2 (Sept 2006) - onwards (Comprehensive)

Notes

  • Final issue Vol. 25, No. 2 December 2019

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2002

Works about this Work

Yes Lucy Tatman , 2019 single work
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 317-318)
Persistence Kung Fu Meaghan Morris , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 288-289)
Persistence Graeme Turner , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 286-287)
'Even though the Cultural Studies Review is now, after two iterations and many years, finally reaching the end of its career, its production teams’ commitment to serving the cultural studies community exemplifies the value of persistence. Unfortunately, its closure takes on added significance right now as it joins a worrying number of instances of institutional disinvestment in our field. Persistence seems to be running in just one direction. At its peak, Australian cultural studies had many strong local journals, it was successfully taught as a stand-alone field in a couple of dozen universities, it returned outstanding results across a range of ARC grants programs, and it became one of the most internationally engaged and respected of the humanities research fields in Australia. It even reached the point where people in other disciplines started to think there might be an advantage in pretending that they did cultural studies, too. We had mixed feelings about this, of course. While it provided welcome evidence of our influence and visibility, it also had the ironic consequence of tempting some of those who strongly identified with the field to engage in precisely the kind of boundary policing that had made cultural studies necessary in the first place. Nonetheless, for at least twenty years from the late 1980s, Australian cultural studies was that rare thing—a field of critical teaching and research in the humanities that prospered in what were, in general, difficult times for the humanities disciplines in Australia.' (Introduction)
Messy History Peg Fraser , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 262-264)
Melancholia Anja Schwarz , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 259-261)
Knowledge Valves. Or, Keeping Cultural Studies Going. Stephen Muecke , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 244-246)
'One tends to ignore the periodicity of periodicals, that their composition depends on the building up of various intensities to the point of release that is their publication every three or six months. How can rhythmanalysis help us conceive of the persistence of a collective project, like running a journal? When it comes to each writer attending to their individual contribution, surely they are thinking that their content is what matters, not the form or the rhythm? As the deadline approaches, content may well be what they worry about, but are they not attuned from the start to the proposed theme (like ‘Extinction,’ Cultural Studies Review 25:1 (2019)), a theme that has energised them enough to accept the invitation to begin to research and write? ‘Everywhere where there is interaction between a place, a time and an expenditure of energy, there is rhythm,’ writes Lefebvre, but hasn’t place disappeared in the era of the on-line publication? Place has become referential rather than literally regional, territorial (or even national).' (Introduction)
Love in End Times Alison Ravenscroft , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 256-258)
Melancholia Anja Schwarz , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 259-261)
Messy History Peg Fraser , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 262-264)
Persistence Graeme Turner , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , December vol. 25 no. 2 2019; (p. 286-287)
'Even though the Cultural Studies Review is now, after two iterations and many years, finally reaching the end of its career, its production teams’ commitment to serving the cultural studies community exemplifies the value of persistence. Unfortunately, its closure takes on added significance right now as it joins a worrying number of instances of institutional disinvestment in our field. Persistence seems to be running in just one direction. At its peak, Australian cultural studies had many strong local journals, it was successfully taught as a stand-alone field in a couple of dozen universities, it returned outstanding results across a range of ARC grants programs, and it became one of the most internationally engaged and respected of the humanities research fields in Australia. It even reached the point where people in other disciplines started to think there might be an advantage in pretending that they did cultural studies, too. We had mixed feelings about this, of course. While it provided welcome evidence of our influence and visibility, it also had the ironic consequence of tempting some of those who strongly identified with the field to engage in precisely the kind of boundary policing that had made cultural studies necessary in the first place. Nonetheless, for at least twenty years from the late 1980s, Australian cultural studies was that rare thing—a field of critical teaching and research in the humanities that prospered in what were, in general, difficult times for the humanities disciplines in Australia.' (Introduction)

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

ISSN: 1837-8692 (online)
ISSN: 1446-8123
Frequency:
2 issues per annum
Range:
Vol.8 no.1 May 2002 -
Continues:
UTS Review Vol 1 1995 - v.7 no.2 November 2001 and continues its numbering
Note:
Joint publication of the University of Technology, Sydney and the University of Melbourne
Note:
Published electronically from 2010
Last amended 8 Jan 2020 10:03:12
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