Joowindoo Goonduhmu single work   poetry   "Ngujoo nye muyunube/I can see a lot of people coming"
  • Author: Lionel Fogarty http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/fogarty-lionel
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 Joowindoo Goonduhmu
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Quick Sing
Language: English
Notes:
Poem published both in English and the 'creole language of the Murri Aboriginal people' (Editor's note).

Works about this Work

Material Resonance : Knowing before Meaning Bill Ashcroft , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Decolonizing the Landscape : Indigenous Cultures in Australia 2014; (p. 107-128)

'WHAT IS IT TO KNOW WHAT WE KNOW? I want to talk about what we can know about the other in the interstices of cultures, in that contact zone in which subjects are mutually transformed. In particular I want to talk about the space that lies just beyond interpretation, beyond the boundary of that product we call 'meaning' to see how we might know the unknowable, might 'know' the Indigenous experience of the world, a form of knowledge outside, perhaps, the boundaries of our epistemology. I say 'beyond' but it may be better understood as a communication that occurs before the interpretation of meaning, in a non-hermeneutic engagement with the materiality of the text. '

Source: Paragraph one (p.107).

Material Resonance : Knowing before Meaning Bill Ashcroft , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Decolonizing the Landscape : Indigenous Cultures in Australia 2014; (p. 107-128)

'WHAT IS IT TO KNOW WHAT WE KNOW? I want to talk about what we can know about the other in the interstices of cultures, in that contact zone in which subjects are mutually transformed. In particular I want to talk about the space that lies just beyond interpretation, beyond the boundary of that product we call 'meaning' to see how we might know the unknowable, might 'know' the Indigenous experience of the world, a form of knowledge outside, perhaps, the boundaries of our epistemology. I say 'beyond' but it may be better understood as a communication that occurs before the interpretation of meaning, in a non-hermeneutic engagement with the materiality of the text. '

Source: Paragraph one (p.107).

Last amended 15 Sep 2003 10:23:31
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