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Issue Details: First known date: 2002... 2002 Australian Short Fiction : A History
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A comprehensive survey of Australian short fiction from 1825 to 2001 which looks at social and literary movements and preoccupations as well as the works of individual writers.

Contents

* Contents derived from the St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,:University of Queensland Press , 2002 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Oceans of Story, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 1-10, notes 319-320)
Unquiet Spirits : 1825-1880, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 11-39, notes 320-322)
'A Masculine Ascendancy'? : The 1880s and 1890s, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 40-68, notes 322-325)
Alternative Traditions : 1880-1930, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 69-100, notes 325-329)
Local Loyalties and Modernist Impulses : 1930-1950, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 101-144, notes 329-332)
Politics, Location and Storytelling : 1950-1970, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 145-178, notes 333-335)
Days of Wine, Rage and 'The Little Dance' : The 1970s, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 179-224, notes 335-339)
Home and Away : 1980-2000, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 225-290, notes 352-353)
States of the Art, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 291-314, notes 342-344)
Australian Short Fiction : A History : Afterword, Bruce Bennett , 2002 single work criticism (p. 315-318, notes 344)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Time in Some Aussie and Kiwi Short Stories : Lawson, Baynton, Palmer, and Sargeson Angelo Righetti , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Time and the Short Story 2012; (p. 105-118)
'The short story in Australia and New Zealand has flourished from the last decade of the nineteenth century onwards, and has been strictly bound to orality - yarns, yarn-spinning (Bennet 5) - from its early days, as the speech cadence of a usually sympathetic storyteller, either involved in the narrative, or simply an eye-witness or a bystander, interacting with listeners / readers, influences its time-scale, rhythm, tempo and structure.

A few significant stories by representative short-fiction writers from the late nineteenty century well into the mid-twentieth century - Australian Henry Lawson, Barbara Baynton, Vance Palmer, and New Zealand Frank Sargeson - though reflecting specific colonial realities and issues in a period of nation building, will be discussed here for their contribution to a relatively new genre, with specific regard to their treatment of time, changing from a traditional to a gradually experimental mode where they are sometimes forerunners or aware of modernist techniques.' (105)
The Fence in Australian Short Fiction : 'A Constant Crossing of Boundaries'? Kieran Dolin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cultural History , vol. 28 no. 2/3 2010; (p. 141-153)
'This article contributes to discussions about the significance of fences in the Australian social imaginary. It undertakes a historical and intertextual reading of eight short stories that take the fence as their titular symbol, and explores how the fence story is rewritten at various moments of change in twentieth-century Australia. Developments in narrative form and representation are related to changes in the cultural and political contexts, through a critical engagement with Iser's argument that the institution of literature works through a 'constant crossing of the boundary between the real and the imaginary'. As an Australian icon, the fence image illustrates the continuing power of settler discourse; however, the literary reworkings of the fence story disclose new visions of identity and otherness.' (Author's abstract)
Charity, Morality and Animal Rights : A Brief Life of Ellen Augusta Chads (E.A.C.) Pieter Koster , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 80 2010; (p. 3-14)
'The writings and life of this Colonial Australian journalist and author, steeped in Victorian religious sentiment, have been all but forgotten. She has no living descendant and even her grave does not bear her name. Her stories, magazine articles, and a few scattered references in the literature are all that remain, and they too have been largely forgotten. Her other abiding legacy as an early campaigner for animal rights is unrecognised. This brief biographical sketch aims to fill the gaps in our current knowledge of her life and works.' (3)
Untitled Victor Crittenden , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Margin , November no. 76 2008; (p. 40)

— Review of Australian Short Fiction : A History Bruce Bennett , 2002 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Carol Merli , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 2004; (p. 175-177)

— Review of Australian Short Fiction : A History Bruce Bennett , 2002 multi chapter work criticism
The Creative Classroom Andrew Peek , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Island , Spring no. 90 2002; (p. 51-53)

— Review of In a Cool Blue Light 2002 anthology short story poetry extract ; Australian Short Fiction : A History Bruce Bennett , 2002 multi chapter work criticism
Endangered Species Elizabeth Webby , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 249 2003; (p. 64)

— Review of Australian Short Fiction : A History Bruce Bennett , 2002 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Enza Gandolfo , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , January no. 12 2003;

— Review of Australian Short Fiction : A History Bruce Bennett , 2002 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Carmel Bird , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 1 2003; (p. 129-130)

— Review of Australian Short Fiction : A History Bruce Bennett , 2002 multi chapter work criticism
The Australian Short Story Laurie Hergenhan , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 173 2003; (p. 97-99)

— Review of Australian Short Fiction : A History Bruce Bennett , 2002 multi chapter work criticism
Charity, Morality and Animal Rights : A Brief Life of Ellen Augusta Chads (E.A.C.) Pieter Koster , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , April no. 80 2010; (p. 3-14)
'The writings and life of this Colonial Australian journalist and author, steeped in Victorian religious sentiment, have been all but forgotten. She has no living descendant and even her grave does not bear her name. Her stories, magazine articles, and a few scattered references in the literature are all that remain, and they too have been largely forgotten. Her other abiding legacy as an early campaigner for animal rights is unrecognised. This brief biographical sketch aims to fill the gaps in our current knowledge of her life and works.' (3)
Time in Some Aussie and Kiwi Short Stories : Lawson, Baynton, Palmer, and Sargeson Angelo Righetti , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Time and the Short Story 2012; (p. 105-118)
'The short story in Australia and New Zealand has flourished from the last decade of the nineteenth century onwards, and has been strictly bound to orality - yarns, yarn-spinning (Bennet 5) - from its early days, as the speech cadence of a usually sympathetic storyteller, either involved in the narrative, or simply an eye-witness or a bystander, interacting with listeners / readers, influences its time-scale, rhythm, tempo and structure.

A few significant stories by representative short-fiction writers from the late nineteenty century well into the mid-twentieth century - Australian Henry Lawson, Barbara Baynton, Vance Palmer, and New Zealand Frank Sargeson - though reflecting specific colonial realities and issues in a period of nation building, will be discussed here for their contribution to a relatively new genre, with specific regard to their treatment of time, changing from a traditional to a gradually experimental mode where they are sometimes forerunners or aware of modernist techniques.' (105)
The Fence in Australian Short Fiction : 'A Constant Crossing of Boundaries'? Kieran Dolin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cultural History , vol. 28 no. 2/3 2010; (p. 141-153)
'This article contributes to discussions about the significance of fences in the Australian social imaginary. It undertakes a historical and intertextual reading of eight short stories that take the fence as their titular symbol, and explores how the fence story is rewritten at various moments of change in twentieth-century Australia. Developments in narrative form and representation are related to changes in the cultural and political contexts, through a critical engagement with Iser's argument that the institution of literature works through a 'constant crossing of the boundary between the real and the imaginary'. As an Australian icon, the fence image illustrates the continuing power of settler discourse; however, the literary reworkings of the fence story disclose new visions of identity and otherness.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 31 Mar 2016 08:51:27
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