The 7 Stages of Grieving extract   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 1999... 1999 The 7 Stages of Grieving
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

An extract from Wesley Enoch's drama The Seven Stages of Grieving

Notes

  • Contains the following parts:

    9 - Invasion Poem; 10 - 1788; 11 - Murri Gets a Dress; 12 - Aunty Grace; 13 - Mugshot; 14 - March; 15 - Bargaining; 16 - Home Story.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

[Essay] : The 7 Stages of Grieving Melissa Lucashenko , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: Reading Australia 2013;

'Is it possible to feel too much? For millennia, stories from around the world have had as their explicit task the expansion of the human heart. Only in the past two decades have some stories been prefaced with the words ‘trigger warning’. For the first time in history, certain written narratives have been seen as potentially too powerful, too overwhelming for those who willingly choose to hear them. This isn’t Plato warning us about poets; nor is it the censorship of a thousand authorities through the ages. Trigger warnings are messages to the faithful – ‘Here Be Dragons’. But when did we become so afraid of feeling? This paradox of being drawn to disproportionate emotion lies at the heart of The Seven Stages of Grieving.' (Introduction)

[Essay] : The 7 Stages of Grieving Melissa Lucashenko , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: Reading Australia 2013;

'Is it possible to feel too much? For millennia, stories from around the world have had as their explicit task the expansion of the human heart. Only in the past two decades have some stories been prefaced with the words ‘trigger warning’. For the first time in history, certain written narratives have been seen as potentially too powerful, too overwhelming for those who willingly choose to hear them. This isn’t Plato warning us about poets; nor is it the censorship of a thousand authorities through the ages. Trigger warnings are messages to the faithful – ‘Here Be Dragons’. But when did we become so afraid of feeling? This paradox of being drawn to disproportionate emotion lies at the heart of The Seven Stages of Grieving.' (Introduction)

Last amended 5 May 2017 12:44:21
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X