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The Orchard single work   prose  
Issue Details: First known date: 1995... 1995 The Orchard
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Books of the Week Dawn Albinger , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 19 August 2012; (p. 37)

— Review of The Orchard Drusilla Modjeska , 1995 single work prose
The Charged Classroom : Reading Like Writers, Writing Like Readers Felicity Plunkett , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 307-318)
'This essay is haunted by a poem. Reflecting on my experiences of reading and writing as a student and academic, Sylvia Plath's 'Lady Lazarus' makes its presence felt in that 'metaphysical meeting space'. At the heart of the poem is the monosyllable 'charge' and Plath's risky choice to repeat it four times in five lean lines. The repetition insists on the pursuit of generating charge, in all the complex connotations of that word, within the 'geometry of connections' generated by reading. (Author's introduction, 307)
The Bush and the Garden in the Writing of Drusilla Modjeska and Kate Llewellyn Elizabeth Hicks , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 2 no. 1 2011; (p. 70-81)
'Through the gardens depicted in their Blue Mountains texts of the 1980s and 1990s, Australian writers Drusilla Modjeska and Kate Llewellyn forge a feminist aesthetic in which the binaries of nature/culture, male/female and bush/city co-exist. These texts depict Australia as a nation that no longer looks predominantly to Britain but is a hybrid and transcultural entity which embraces its rich migrant experience.' Source: Elizabeth Hicks,
Greek Olives and Italian Prosciutto on Crusty French Bread : Food in Contemporary Fiction by Australian Women Jennifer Mitchell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'Women have often had a troubled relationship with food, but in recent decades there has been a bit of a turn around - at least in fictional terms. In some earlier Australian feminist fiction from the 1970s and 1980s, women were often portrayed as oppressed by, or resistant to, food and eating. Here I explore food in Kate Grenville's Lilian's Story, Andrea Goldsmith's Gracious Living, and two works by Helen Garner - The Children's Bach and Cosmo Cosmolino. In these stories women refrain from eating, or over indulge, as forms of resistance to oppression. But times have changed. This essay examines the changing nature of how food is represented in fiction by Australian women. The later novels explored here - Drusilla Modjeska's The Orchard, Marion Halligan's The Fog Garden, Stephanie Dowrick Tasting Salt and Amanda Lohrey's Camille's Bread (1995) - significantly reframe food preparation and consumption as positive experiences that promote women's independence, and contribute to their creative lives and personal relationships. These later texts transcend the earlier view of domesticated women as anxious or resistant consumers of food. Instead, food is aesthetically rich and sensually rewarding; a controllable and pleasurable experience promoting health, wellbeing, and positive loving relationships. (Author's abstract)
Tribe Shows the Way Norman Aisbett , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 2 June 2007; (p. 3)
Discusses Drusilla Modjeska's career as a writer and her 2004 visit to New Guinea to study the traditional art of the Omie tribespeople.
The Fruits of Grief Dominique Hecq , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , December vol. 6 no. 4 1994; (p. 2-3)

— Review of The Orchard Drusilla Modjeska , 1995 single work prose
Books of the Week Dawn Albinger , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 19 August 2012; (p. 37)

— Review of The Orchard Drusilla Modjeska , 1995 single work prose
Intertextuality : The White Garden, The Orchard and The Fog Garden Shirley Walker , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: 'Unemployed at Last!' : Essays on Australian Literature to 2002 for Julian Croft 2002; (p. 161-174)
Walker's article discusses and compares three women's narrative, all focussing on gardens and orchards as signifiers of feminie regeneration. With their mixture of genres and sources, the texts are seen as examples of a movement in fiction towards complexity, towards 'the layering of history, essay, autobiography, folk-tale and original story-telling into dense and complicated narratives' (161), where fact and fiction are shown to be related and dependent upon one another, and are woven into a pattern which gives a new meaning to the concept of intertextuality.
Tribe Shows the Way Norman Aisbett , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 2 June 2007; (p. 3)
Discusses Drusilla Modjeska's career as a writer and her 2004 visit to New Guinea to study the traditional art of the Omie tribespeople.
Greek Olives and Italian Prosciutto on Crusty French Bread : Food in Contemporary Fiction by Australian Women Jennifer Mitchell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'Women have often had a troubled relationship with food, but in recent decades there has been a bit of a turn around - at least in fictional terms. In some earlier Australian feminist fiction from the 1970s and 1980s, women were often portrayed as oppressed by, or resistant to, food and eating. Here I explore food in Kate Grenville's Lilian's Story, Andrea Goldsmith's Gracious Living, and two works by Helen Garner - The Children's Bach and Cosmo Cosmolino. In these stories women refrain from eating, or over indulge, as forms of resistance to oppression. But times have changed. This essay examines the changing nature of how food is represented in fiction by Australian women. The later novels explored here - Drusilla Modjeska's The Orchard, Marion Halligan's The Fog Garden, Stephanie Dowrick Tasting Salt and Amanda Lohrey's Camille's Bread (1995) - significantly reframe food preparation and consumption as positive experiences that promote women's independence, and contribute to their creative lives and personal relationships. These later texts transcend the earlier view of domesticated women as anxious or resistant consumers of food. Instead, food is aesthetically rich and sensually rewarding; a controllable and pleasurable experience promoting health, wellbeing, and positive loving relationships. (Author's abstract)
y separately published work icon Dwelling Spaces David Crouch , St Lucia : 2003 Z1792826 2003 single work thesis 'This is an essay in ideas of dwelling in Australia. It brings together a set of contemporary Australian conceptions of interior space and suggests a way of considering the mechanics of writing intimate spaces. It is concerned with a pattern of themes and correspondences.'
Source: Author's abstract
The Bush and the Garden in the Writing of Drusilla Modjeska and Kate Llewellyn Elizabeth Hicks , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 2 no. 1 2011; (p. 70-81)
'Through the gardens depicted in their Blue Mountains texts of the 1980s and 1990s, Australian writers Drusilla Modjeska and Kate Llewellyn forge a feminist aesthetic in which the binaries of nature/culture, male/female and bush/city co-exist. These texts depict Australia as a nation that no longer looks predominantly to Britain but is a hybrid and transcultural entity which embraces its rich migrant experience.' Source: Elizabeth Hicks,
Subjects:
  • Sydney, New South Wales,
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