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person or book cover
Scanned for the Australian Pulp Fiction Industry project.
y separately published work icon Ape of God single work   novel   science fiction   thriller  
Adaptation of Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus Mary Shelley , 1818 single work novel
Issue Details: First known date: 1942... 1942 Ape of God
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Notes

  • Prequel to Monster at Large.
    Developed from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Currawong , 1942 .
      person or book cover
      Scanned for the Australian Pulp Fiction Industry project.
      Extent: 64p.
      Series: Currawong Novels Currawong (publisher), 1941-1951 series - publisher novel The Currawong Novels series included a variety of fiction such as mystery, romance and western titles. Using the slogan on their back page, "You Can't Go Wrong with a Currawong", the series consisted of short novelettes of between 48 and 80 pages in length.

Works about this Work

The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Vol Molesworth Graham Stone , 2001 single work biography bibliography review
— Appears in: Notes on Australian Science Fiction 2001; (p. 33-34)
The Golden Age of Australian Science Fiction Sean McMullen , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Literature , vol. 12 no. 3 (Issue 36) 1995; (p. 3-28)
The Golden Age of Australian Science Fiction Sean McMullen , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Literature , vol. 12 no. 3 (Issue 36) 1995; (p. 3-28)
Vol Molesworth Graham Stone , 2001 single work biography bibliography review
— Appears in: Notes on Australian Science Fiction 2001; (p. 33-34)
The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Last amended 30 Aug 2017 09:32:05
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