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First known date: 2000 Issue Details: First known date: 2000... vol. 15 no. 2 Winter 2000 of Australian Studies est. 1988 Australian Studies
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Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
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England,
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United Kingdom (UK),
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Western Europe, Europe,
:
Frank Cass Publishers , 2002 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Australian Literary Studies Bushwhacked?, David Callahan , single work criticism
David Callahan provides an introduction to the collection of essays, reflecting on the 'insecurity' felt within the discipline of Australian literary studies.
(p. 1-16)
Cyberspace and Oz Lit : Mark Davis, McKenzie Wark and the Re-Alignment of Australian Literature, Ruth Brown , single work criticism
Ruth Brown argues that 'the globalised milieu in which any literature must now be read is so vastly different from anything that has gone before that it requires a complete re-think of what constitutes a "national" literature' (18). After analysing the arguments of Davis and Wark, she looks at the role of Australian studies offshore in this rethinking, both in terms of celebrity and commodity culture and in critical reflection.
(p. 17-36)
Ethnic Autobiography and the Cult of Authenticity, Graham Huggan , single work criticism (p. 37-62)
Melancholy in Mudrooroo's Dr Wooreddy's Prescription, Anne Maxwell , single work criticism
The author writes: 'In this essay, I will focus on a recent Australian novel [Dr Wooreddy's Prescription for Enduring the End of the World] to support my contention that the concept of melancholy was being employed by indigenous writers in the 1980s, at the very time postmodernism was gaining ascendancy, precisely because of its oppositional potential. At the same time, in using a text by an Aboriginal writer, I hope to be able to shed some light on the question of the universal appeal of melancholy' (63).
(p. 63-83)
Abjection and Nationality in Patrick White's A Fringe of Leaves, Briar Wood , single work criticism (p. 84-94)
Misogyny, Muscles and Machines : Cars and Masculinity in Australian Literature, Rebecca Johinke , single work criticism
Rebecca Johinke reads Peter Carey's short story 'Crabs' for 'insight into the self-defeating pursuit of normative masculinities in the Australian car culture' (95).
(p. 95-111)
May in September : Australian Literature as Anglophone Alternative, Nicholas Birns , single work criticism
Nicholas Birns considers that attractions of Australian literary studies for overseas scholars. In the second part of his essay, Birns offers close readings of several of Gerald Murnane's short stories to argue that paying 'heed to Australian writing can vividly and unpredictably renovate 'English' as a discipline' (128).
(p. 112-132)
From European Satellite to Asian Backwater?, Lars Jensen , single work criticism
Lars Jensen reads Adib Khan's Seasonal Adjustments in order to discuss 'how Australia looks from a comparative Asian perspective' (134).
(p. 133-152)
Australia in Oceania, Juniper Ellis , single work criticism
Juniper Ellis argues: 'If Oceania properly includes Australia, an Australia that emerges anew when seen in the context of this long-standing Pacific panorama, then Australian post-coloniality must be comprised not only of local and national forces but also of regional ones' (155). Ellis reads the work of Albert Wendt, Sia Figiel, Vilsoni Hereniko and John Kasaipwalova for connections to and reflections on Australia.
(p. 151-172)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Contemporary Issues in Australian Literature

Works about this Work

Can Indigenous Contemporary Literature of Australia Sustain Itself by Becoming International? Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2007 single work criticism 'Nourishing and sustaining cultural diversity in today's constantly changing world, with all its complexities and socio-cultural peculiarities of people and their creations, and at times of an aggressive economic Anglophone globalisation of cultures and literatures, is a task of an imperative formation that needs to be cared for at many levels of the social life and organisation. In Australia, to maintain one's own culture is to be persistently aware of personal heritage and to be able to elaborate traditions. As time passes quickly and we live in a world that praises swiftness and efficiency, money and mass culture, losing the mother tongue and become estranged from our cultural environments occurs frequently. Everyday mainstream cultural reality pushes us to concentrate on our own area of work...'(From author's introduction)
Can Indigenous Contemporary Literature of Australia Sustain Itself by Becoming International? Teresa Podemska-Abt , 2007 single work criticism 'Nourishing and sustaining cultural diversity in today's constantly changing world, with all its complexities and socio-cultural peculiarities of people and their creations, and at times of an aggressive economic Anglophone globalisation of cultures and literatures, is a task of an imperative formation that needs to be cared for at many levels of the social life and organisation. In Australia, to maintain one's own culture is to be persistently aware of personal heritage and to be able to elaborate traditions. As time passes quickly and we live in a world that praises swiftness and efficiency, money and mass culture, losing the mother tongue and become estranged from our cultural environments occurs frequently. Everyday mainstream cultural reality pushes us to concentrate on our own area of work...'(From author's introduction)
Last amended 29 Jun 2007 08:58:51
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