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y separately published work icon Moonlite single work   novel   satire  
Issue Details: First known date: 1981... 1981 Moonlite
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • South Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Macmillan , 1981 .
      Extent: 223p.
      Reprinted: 1982 with ISBN 0330269518; 0330270370
      ISBN: 0333337484
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1987 .
      Extent: 213p.
      ISBN: 0140063358
    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Vintage , 1996 .
      Extent: 213p.
      ISBN: 0091832314
Alternative title: 月光人
Transliterated title: Yue guang ren
Language: Chinese

Works about this Work

Satirising White Australia in Christina Stead’s For Love Alone Lucinda O'Brien , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Christina Stead's For Love Alone is an iconic text in Australian literary studies, but until now, few critics have addressed the novel's treatment of colonialism and race relations. Feminist critics have played an important role in preserving Stead's reputation, and for this reason, most critical discussions of For Love Alone focus on its gender politics. This criticism generally regards Stead's protagonist, Teresa Hawkins, as a feminist heroine engaged in a struggle against patriarchy. This ideological approach is a valuable corrective to more autobiographical readings of For Love Alone, which treat the novel, rather reductively, as an account of Stead's personal experiences or as an expression of her 'private mythology'. Yet I argue that in taking Teresa for a heroine, feminist scholars do not sufficiently recognise Teresa's status as an object of satire. In this article, I highlight Stead's sharply satiric portrayal of Teresa as a narcissist, whose voyage of discovery ironically highlights her inability to learn or to change. I contend that Teresa's journey to London reveals her affinities with the regressive, racist ideology of her father and her love object, Jonathan Crow. In her self-appointed role as an 'Australian Ulysses', Teresa demonstrates the links between Australian nationalism, imperialism and racist ideologies. Without disputing the importance of feminist themes in the novel, I propose a new reading of For love alone as a complex work of postcolonial satire.' (Author's abstract)
Satirical Histories: Moonlite and The Adventures of Christian Rosy Cross Susan Lever , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: David Foster : The Satirist of Australia 2008; (p. 61-87)
The Colonizer's Gift of Cursing : Satire in David Foster's Moonlite Susan Lever , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cheeky Fictions : Laughter and the Postcolonial 2005; (p. 107-116)
'Moonlite offers a more complex account of colonialism than the simple colonizer / colonized dichotomy. The source of its humour lies in the multiple ironies of history, where the colonized colonize in turn. Despsite the tragedy of loss and displacement, the novel suggests that the process has a degree of inherent silliness as settler-societies, like Australia, mimic and admire the patterns of the colonzing society that has expolited them.'
The Absurdity of Necessity Veronica Brady , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 200 1998; (p. 18)

— Review of Moonlite David Foster , 1981 single work novel
David Foster's 'Moonlite': Re-Viewing History as Satirical Fable- Towards a Post-Colonial Past Stephen Harris , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , Autumn vol. 42 no. 1 1997; (p. 71-88)
Finding Their Range : Some Recent Australian Novels Peter Pierce , 1981 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 40 no. 4 1981; (p. 522-525)

— Review of Turtle Beach Blanche d'Alpuget , 1981 single work novel ; Bliss Peter Carey , 1981 single work novel ; Man of Letters : A Romance Glen Tomasetti , 1981 single work novel ; City of Women : A Novel David Ireland , 1981 single work novel ; Moonlite David Foster , 1981 single work novel ; Monkeys in the Dark Blanche d'Alpuget , 1980 single work novel
The Experimenters Michael Cotter , 1982 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , July no. 88 1982; (p. 62-65)

— Review of The Escape Machine James McQueen , 1981 selected work short story ; Who Shot George Kirkland? : A Novel About the Nature of Truth Frank Hardy , 1981 single work novel ; The Wife Specialist : Stories Laurie Clancy , 1979 selected work short story ; Moonlite David Foster , 1981 single work novel
Entertaining and a Poser of Big Questions Manning Clark , 1981 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 23 June vol. 101 no. 5268 1981; (p. 87-88)

— Review of Moonlite David Foster , 1981 single work novel
The Absurdity of Necessity Veronica Brady , 1981 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 33 1981; (p. 1)

— Review of Moonlite David Foster , 1981 single work novel
Untitled Bruce Gillespie , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Literature , vol. 5 no. 1 (Issue 13) 1983; (p. 32-33)

— Review of Moonlite David Foster , 1981 single work novel
Bare-Breech'd Brethren : The Novels of David Foster A. P. Riemer , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , June vol. 47 no. 2 1987; (p. 126-144)
The Colonizer's Gift of Cursing : Satire in David Foster's Moonlite Susan Lever , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cheeky Fictions : Laughter and the Postcolonial 2005; (p. 107-116)
'Moonlite offers a more complex account of colonialism than the simple colonizer / colonized dichotomy. The source of its humour lies in the multiple ironies of history, where the colonized colonize in turn. Despsite the tragedy of loss and displacement, the novel suggests that the process has a degree of inherent silliness as settler-societies, like Australia, mimic and admire the patterns of the colonzing society that has expolited them.'
Satirical Histories: Moonlite and The Adventures of Christian Rosy Cross Susan Lever , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: David Foster : The Satirist of Australia 2008; (p. 61-87)
Satirising White Australia in Christina Stead’s For Love Alone Lucinda O'Brien , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'Christina Stead's For Love Alone is an iconic text in Australian literary studies, but until now, few critics have addressed the novel's treatment of colonialism and race relations. Feminist critics have played an important role in preserving Stead's reputation, and for this reason, most critical discussions of For Love Alone focus on its gender politics. This criticism generally regards Stead's protagonist, Teresa Hawkins, as a feminist heroine engaged in a struggle against patriarchy. This ideological approach is a valuable corrective to more autobiographical readings of For Love Alone, which treat the novel, rather reductively, as an account of Stead's personal experiences or as an expression of her 'private mythology'. Yet I argue that in taking Teresa for a heroine, feminist scholars do not sufficiently recognise Teresa's status as an object of satire. In this article, I highlight Stead's sharply satiric portrayal of Teresa as a narcissist, whose voyage of discovery ironically highlights her inability to learn or to change. I contend that Teresa's journey to London reveals her affinities with the regressive, racist ideology of her father and her love object, Jonathan Crow. In her self-appointed role as an 'Australian Ulysses', Teresa demonstrates the links between Australian nationalism, imperialism and racist ideologies. Without disputing the importance of feminist themes in the novel, I propose a new reading of For love alone as a complex work of postcolonial satire.' (Author's abstract)
David Foster's 'Moonlite': Re-Viewing History as Satirical Fable- Towards a Post-Colonial Past Stephen Harris , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , Autumn vol. 42 no. 1 1997; (p. 71-88)
Last amended 11 Aug 2013 10:56:02
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