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Issue Details: First known date: 1999... 1999 The Tiger and the Kangaroo Went to Sea : On Becoming an Australian : autobiographical
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Patricia Pengilley...takes us with her, in this autobiographical journey, on an exploration of identity and self knowledge.' (Back cover)

Notes

  • Dedication: To the pioneers of the past, present and future and to the storytellers of the past, present and future.
  • Epigraph: 'The owl and the pussy-cat went to sea
    In a beautiful pea-green boat;' - Edward Lear.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Blackburn, Blackburn - Mitcham - Vermont area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: PenFolk Publishing , 1999 .
      Extent: xi, 325p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliographical references (pp. 320-324) and glossary (p.325).
      • Cover title: The Tiger and the Kanagroo Went to Sea : on becoming an Australian.
      ISBN: 1875894152

Works about this Work

On Becoming an Australian : The Journey of Patricia Pengilley Sanghamitra Dalal , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Claiming Space for Australian Women's Writing 2017; (p. 291-307)

'The chapter focuses on the Anglo-Indian-Australian author, Patricia Pengilley (1926–2010) and her autobiographical novel The Tiger and the Kangaroo Went to Sea: On Becoming an Australian (1999). The author focuses on the conflicting and evolving experiences of Pengilley as a diasporic Anglo-Indian-Australian. The chapter examines the intensities and intimacies of the contact zones, where Pengilley struggles with her Eurasian, colonial, English, Indian and Australian selves in order to claim a space of her own in her adopted country. As Pengilley encounters the process of diasporic cultural translation on her way to becoming an Australian, the author argues that the essence of diasporic identity and belonging are not characterized by homogeneity or separateness, but can be articulated in terms of multiple possibilities and positionalities.'

Source: Abstract.

On Becoming an Australian : The Journey of Patricia Pengilley Sanghamitra Dalal , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Claiming Space for Australian Women's Writing 2017; (p. 291-307)

'The chapter focuses on the Anglo-Indian-Australian author, Patricia Pengilley (1926–2010) and her autobiographical novel The Tiger and the Kangaroo Went to Sea: On Becoming an Australian (1999). The author focuses on the conflicting and evolving experiences of Pengilley as a diasporic Anglo-Indian-Australian. The chapter examines the intensities and intimacies of the contact zones, where Pengilley struggles with her Eurasian, colonial, English, Indian and Australian selves in order to claim a space of her own in her adopted country. As Pengilley encounters the process of diasporic cultural translation on her way to becoming an Australian, the author argues that the essence of diasporic identity and belonging are not characterized by homogeneity or separateness, but can be articulated in terms of multiple possibilities and positionalities.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 12 May 2014 12:28:22
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