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Issue Details: First known date: 1963-... 1963- Bookbird
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature is the quarterly journal of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY). Each issue of Bookbird publishes long and short articles that focus on a specific theme, genre, or region of the world. The other regular columns are Focus Ibby, Country Survey, Author Spotlight, Reading Promotio, International Children's Books of Note, Professional Literature, and News and Announcements. The journal also includes news from IBBY and IBBY National Sections. ... Articles in Bookbird are regularly clustered around topics and issues of international interest. The regular columns include author and illustrator profiles, a country focus and book reviews and recommendations. Bookbird also pays special attention to reading promotion projects worldwide and contains news of IBBY projects and events in the Focus IBBY column' (Adapted from the University of Toronto Press website: http://www.utpjournals.com/ sighted 23/12/2004)

Notes

  • Subtitle; A Journal of International Children's Literature
  • RANGE: 1963-
  • FREQUENCY: Quarterly
  • Indexed comprehensively until 2017. Due to resourcing issues, this periodical will no longer be comprehensively indexed.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

How Bookbird Spread Its Wings—a Short History of the Periodical 1962-1993 Lucia Binder , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 55 no. 4 2017; (p. 80-81)

'Just as the periodical serves as a common forum, it also grew out of the common work. The somewhat poetical name—Bookbird—was given by Jella Lepman to the little mimeographed information sheet that was published at irregular intervals following her foundation of the International Youth Library. Unfortunately, this first little "Book-Bird" was to die shortly after.' (Introduction)

Bookbird 1957-1962—The Beginnings of the First International Journal for Children's Literature Christiane Raabe , Nikola von Merveldt (translator), 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 55 no. 4 2017; (p. 75-79)

'Fall 1956: A member of the board of directors of the Rockefeller Foundation came to visit Jella Lepman in Munich. He told the sixty-five-year-old founder of the International Youth Library and of the International Board of Books for Young People about a world-wide project for developing countries, initiated and financed by UNESCO, the Rockefeller Foundation, and other American foundations. The aim was to support the developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America in their modernization and industrialization efforts in the areas of economics, politics, and culture. Could Jella Lepman have imagined participating in this project and incorporating children's literature? Lepman did not hesitate. The temptation to spread the word about the power of children's literature to promote international understanding and peace further around the world was far too great. In her autobiography, A Bridge of Children's Books, Lepman remembers: "This would be a unique opportunity to spread the idea of international understanding through children's books to countries that were just coming into their own. Once more, fate was knocking at my door." Back then, no one would have guessed that this memorable meeting would mark the beginning of the journal Bookbird.' (Introduction)

Bookbird 1957-1962—The Beginnings of the First International Journal for Children's Literature Christiane Raabe , Nikola von Merveldt (translator), 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 55 no. 4 2017; (p. 75-79)

'Fall 1956: A member of the board of directors of the Rockefeller Foundation came to visit Jella Lepman in Munich. He told the sixty-five-year-old founder of the International Youth Library and of the International Board of Books for Young People about a world-wide project for developing countries, initiated and financed by UNESCO, the Rockefeller Foundation, and other American foundations. The aim was to support the developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America in their modernization and industrialization efforts in the areas of economics, politics, and culture. Could Jella Lepman have imagined participating in this project and incorporating children's literature? Lepman did not hesitate. The temptation to spread the word about the power of children's literature to promote international understanding and peace further around the world was far too great. In her autobiography, A Bridge of Children's Books, Lepman remembers: "This would be a unique opportunity to spread the idea of international understanding through children's books to countries that were just coming into their own. Once more, fate was knocking at my door." Back then, no one would have guessed that this memorable meeting would mark the beginning of the journal Bookbird.' (Introduction)

How Bookbird Spread Its Wings—a Short History of the Periodical 1962-1993 Lucia Binder , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 55 no. 4 2017; (p. 80-81)

'Just as the periodical serves as a common forum, it also grew out of the common work. The somewhat poetical name—Bookbird—was given by Jella Lepman to the little mimeographed information sheet that was published at irregular intervals following her foundation of the International Youth Library. Unfortunately, this first little "Book-Bird" was to die shortly after.' (Introduction)

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

ISSN: 0006 7377
Last amended 16 Apr 2020 07:06:42
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