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Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000 Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Verse text (and where accessible tunes) of approximately 140 transportation broadside songs and verses, with extracts from personal stories of convicts as given in letters, diaries, chapbooks, and reminiscences. More than 150 illustrations, including the art work of headpieces and reproduction of drawings and engravings. Introduction surveys books and articles dealing with the broadside industry and with convict transportation.

Notes

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Hotham Hill, Flemington - North Melbourne area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,:Red Rooster Press , 2000 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Moralising Convicti"One day as I to see the works,", Anonymous , 1833 single work poetry (p. 1)
Botany Bay Song: Sung at the Anacreontic Societyi"You have read of Captain Cook, our late worthy commander,", Anonymous , 1790 single work poetry (p. 4)
Buffer, Don't Cry for Mei"What ups and downs and bobberies, what changes we do see,", Anonymous , 1830 single work poetry (p. 8)
Botany Bay, a New Songi"Let us drink a good health to our schemers above,", 1790 single work poetry (p. 95-96)
Melancholy News of the Convict Ship George the Thirdi"Farewell, dear friends and comrades all,", 2000 single work poetry (p. 122-123)
Van Diemen's Landi"Come all you gallant poachers that ramble free from care,", 1964 single work poetry (p. 173)
The Jolly Lad's Trip to Botany Bayi"Come come my jolly lads, for we must away", 1786-1790 single work poetry (p. 181)
Note: Titled 'The Jolly Lad's Trip'.
Henry's Downfalli"Come all you wild and wicked youths wherever you may be,", 1976 single work poetry (p. 187)
The Ballad of Martin Cashi"Come all you sons of Erin's Isle that love to hear your tuneful notes -", Francis MacNamara , 1870 single work poetry (p. 211-212)
Note: Alternate title used: Martin Cash
The Female Transporti"Come all young girls, both far and near, and listen unto me,", 1823 single work poetry (p. 216-217)
John Mitchel's Escapei"Hurrah for John Mitchel, you must understand,", 2000 single work poetry (p. 376)
The Escape of Meagheri"You true Irish heroes to me lend an ear", 1986 single work poetry (p. 403-404)
The Lamentation of the Rev. Father Campbelli"Come all you Roman Catholic, that's in your native home", 2000 single work poetry (p. 429)
The Cyprus Brigi"Poor Tom Brown from Nottingham, Jack Williams and poor Joe,", 1954 single work poetry (p. 484)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Transported to Botany Bay : Imagining Australia in Nineteenth-Century Convict Broadsides Dorice Williams Elliott , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Victorian Literature and Culture , June vol. 43 no. 2 2015; (p. 235-259)
'The speaker of this ballad (circa 1828) laments the fact that, though he was born of “honest parents,” he became “a roving blade” and has been convicted of an unspecified crime for which he has been sentenced to “Botany Bay,” a popular name for Australia. Although he addresses his audience as “young men of learning,” the rest of the ballad implies that he, as is conventional in the broadside form, is a working-class apprentice gone astray. Like this fictional speaker, approximately 160,000 men and women convicted of crimes ranging from poaching hares to murder – but mostly theft – were transported to one of the new British colonies in Australia between the years 1787 and 1867. Minor crimes such as shoplifting, which today would merit some community service and a fine, yielded a sentence of seven years, while other felons were sentenced for fourteen years to life for more serious crimes. While non-fictional accounts of the young colony of New South Wales were published in Britain almost as soon as the First Fleet arrived there in 1788, these were written by people with at least a middle-class education, whereas the vast majority of the convicted felons who were transported came from the working classes. Since books and newspapers were expensive and the level of literacy among working-class people varied considerably, few of them would have had access to such accounts of the new colonies. Several descriptions, mostly borrowed from the writings of the officers who accompanied the First Fleet, were published in cheap chapbook form, while occasional letters from convicts to their families were printed and distributed, and of course there were unpublished letters plus word-of-mouth reports from convicts or soldiers who did return. But none of these were broadly disseminated among working-class people.' (Publication abstract)
Working-Class Literature about Convicts Val Noone , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Tain , April-May no. 30 2004; (p. 28)

— Review of Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868 2000 anthology poetry criticism diary autobiography
Convict History from Below Bill Tully , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Blast , Autumn no. 44 2001; (p. 26)

— Review of Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868 2000 anthology poetry criticism diary autobiography
A Rich Tradition of the Poor Colleen Burke , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 163 2001; (p. 119-121)

— Review of Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868 2000 anthology poetry criticism diary autobiography
Convict History from Below Bill Tully , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Blast , Autumn no. 44 2001; (p. 26)

— Review of Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868 2000 anthology poetry criticism diary autobiography
Working-Class Literature about Convicts Val Noone , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Tain , April-May no. 30 2004; (p. 28)

— Review of Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868 2000 anthology poetry criticism diary autobiography
A Rich Tradition of the Poor Colleen Burke , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 163 2001; (p. 119-121)

— Review of Farewell to Judges and Juries : The Broadside Ballads and Convict Transportation to Australia, 1788-1868 2000 anthology poetry criticism diary autobiography
Transported to Botany Bay : Imagining Australia in Nineteenth-Century Convict Broadsides Dorice Williams Elliott , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Victorian Literature and Culture , June vol. 43 no. 2 2015; (p. 235-259)
'The speaker of this ballad (circa 1828) laments the fact that, though he was born of “honest parents,” he became “a roving blade” and has been convicted of an unspecified crime for which he has been sentenced to “Botany Bay,” a popular name for Australia. Although he addresses his audience as “young men of learning,” the rest of the ballad implies that he, as is conventional in the broadside form, is a working-class apprentice gone astray. Like this fictional speaker, approximately 160,000 men and women convicted of crimes ranging from poaching hares to murder – but mostly theft – were transported to one of the new British colonies in Australia between the years 1787 and 1867. Minor crimes such as shoplifting, which today would merit some community service and a fine, yielded a sentence of seven years, while other felons were sentenced for fourteen years to life for more serious crimes. While non-fictional accounts of the young colony of New South Wales were published in Britain almost as soon as the First Fleet arrived there in 1788, these were written by people with at least a middle-class education, whereas the vast majority of the convicted felons who were transported came from the working classes. Since books and newspapers were expensive and the level of literacy among working-class people varied considerably, few of them would have had access to such accounts of the new colonies. Several descriptions, mostly borrowed from the writings of the officers who accompanied the First Fleet, were published in cheap chapbook form, while occasional letters from convicts to their families were printed and distributed, and of course there were unpublished letters plus word-of-mouth reports from convicts or soldiers who did return. But none of these were broadly disseminated among working-class people.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 22 Oct 2007 10:53:26
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