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y separately published work icon Spooks and Spirits : Eight Eerie Tales anthology   children's fiction   children's   horror  
Issue Details: First known date: 1978... 1978 Spooks and Spirits : Eight Eerie Tales
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Hodder and Stoughton Australia , 1978 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Katzenfell, Christobel Mattingley , single work short story
The Unbeliever, Elisabeth MacIntyre , single work children's fiction
The Ghost Trick, Michael Dugan , single work children's fiction
Sam, Sam, the Contrary Man, Jean Chapman , single work children's fiction
Somebody Lives in the Nobody House, Ruth Park , single work children's fiction children's
Violet, Natalie Scott , single work children's fiction
All Old Empty Houses Have Cobwebs, Pat Johnson , single work children's fiction
Footprints in Sepwala, James Porter , single work children's fiction

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Untitled John Cohen , 1979 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , April vol. 71 no. 1979; (p. 52)

— Review of Spooks and Spirits : Eight Eerie Tales 1978 anthology children's fiction
Untitled John Cohen , 1979 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , April vol. 71 no. 1979; (p. 52)

— Review of Spooks and Spirits : Eight Eerie Tales 1978 anthology children's fiction
The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Last amended 30 Mar 2017 09:34:20
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