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... Virtue
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Notes

  • A comedy in four acts.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      .
      (Manuscript) assertion

      Holdings

      Held at: Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW
      Location: ML MSS 6035/19

Works about this Work

'Living in Sin' : Money and Morals in 'Virtue', a Play by Stella Miles Franklin Janet Lee , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 16 November vol. 31 no. 5 2016;

'This paper revives Stella Miles Franklin’s 1917 play, ‘Virtue’, a long-forgotten protest drama about economic servitude, sexual desire, and the perils of prostitution. I discuss the ways Franklin uses ‘Virtue’ to first, protest the perils of female economic vulnerability that lead working women into liaisons with men, and second, to illustrate the dangerous promiscuities associated with modern sex radical solutions to women’s sexual subordination that enslave rather than liberate. I suggest Franklin’s feminist politics on the cusp between New Womanist claims challenging sexual codes and those endorsing the sexual morality of a previous generation ideally positioned her to produce a new realism gesturing towards a modernist literary aesthetic in its economic critique of sexual expressions masquerading as ‘freedom’.'

Source: Abstract.

'Living in Sin' : Money and Morals in 'Virtue', a Play by Stella Miles Franklin Janet Lee , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 16 November vol. 31 no. 5 2016;

'This paper revives Stella Miles Franklin’s 1917 play, ‘Virtue’, a long-forgotten protest drama about economic servitude, sexual desire, and the perils of prostitution. I discuss the ways Franklin uses ‘Virtue’ to first, protest the perils of female economic vulnerability that lead working women into liaisons with men, and second, to illustrate the dangerous promiscuities associated with modern sex radical solutions to women’s sexual subordination that enslave rather than liberate. I suggest Franklin’s feminist politics on the cusp between New Womanist claims challenging sexual codes and those endorsing the sexual morality of a previous generation ideally positioned her to produce a new realism gesturing towards a modernist literary aesthetic in its economic critique of sexual expressions masquerading as ‘freedom’.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 21 Jun 2002 13:57:22
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