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Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y separately published work icon The Chance of Politics single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 The Chance of Politics
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'After Paul Hasluck’s death in 1993 his son Nicholas, himself a well-known writer, read the extraordinary manuscript on which The Chance of Politics is based. Drawn from Hasluck’s private notebooks, it provides intimate portraits of people he knew in Canberra: among them Evatt, Casey, Barwick, Calwell, McEwen, McMahon, Whitlam and Fraser. There is also an enthralling account of events after the death of Harold Holt when John Gorton defeated Hasluck in a ballot to decide the new prime minister.

'Vivid, honest and wise, The Chance of Politics is more than a brilliant work of biography or an informal history of a fascinating era. In describing the struggles for power, the clashes of will and the trade-offs between leadership and expedience, Paul Hasluck takes us to the heart of politics and political character.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 1997 .
      image of person or book cover 2487315605312542595.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 228p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Nicholas Hasluck.
      ISBN: 9781875847372

Works about this Work

Australia in Brief CB , 1997 single work essay
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 3 October no. 4931 1997;

'Sir Paul Hasluck missed out on being Australian Prime Minister by a handful of party-room votes in 1968. Despite his elevation to the Governor-Generalship the next year, Hasluck never quite forgave his colleagues for the slight. He was the wrong man to have offended.'  (Introduction)

Australia in Brief CB , 1997 single work essay
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 3 October no. 4931 1997;

'Sir Paul Hasluck missed out on being Australian Prime Minister by a handful of party-room votes in 1968. Despite his elevation to the Governor-Generalship the next year, Hasluck never quite forgave his colleagues for the slight. He was the wrong man to have offended.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 13 Apr 2018 05:57:06
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