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y separately published work icon Bob the Builder and the Elves single work   children's fiction   children's   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 Bob the Builder and the Elves
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Bob the Builder is a very happy man until the day his nice, messy house is infested with elves. The elves tidy up Bob's house till it's horribly clean and bright. They even shine his working boots, polish his hard hat, and put fairy bread in his lunch box. His mates just laugh and laugh. Bob is so embarrassed! But with the help of Lily Sweet, the lady next door, he achieves a compromise, and lots of good things follow.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it has a Japanese translation.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Bobu to Rirī to itazura erufu
Alternative title: Me, Lily and the Playful Elves
Alternative title: ボブ ト リリー ト イタズラ エルフ
Alternative title: ボブとリリーといたずらエルフ
Language: Japanese
    • Tokyo, Honshu,
      c
      Japan,
      c
      East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
      :
      Sōensha ,
      2007 .
      image of person or book cover 6896917639766950937.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 87p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 9784882642657 (hbk.)

Other Formats

  • Also braille, sound recording.

Works about this Work

Construction Sites of Sexual Identity : A Reading of Emily Rodda's Bob the Builder and the Elves Elizabeth Parsons , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 11 no. 3 2001; (p. 32-38)
Parsons offers a comprehensive critique of gender roles in Emily Rodda's Bob the Builder and the Elves, and claims that the narrative is 'profoundly conservative' in its underlying promotion of heterosexual ideology (34-35). She points out that while children's literature has usually been perceived as 'innocent' of sexual politics, 'no text is innocent of ideology' and goes on to argue that in Rodda's text, '...the story's correlation of heterosexuality with correctness, normality and 'happily ever after' borders on the homophobic' (32). In his influential text, Language and Ideology in Children's Fiction, John Stephens says that literature is used to teach children 'how to live in the world' and in childrens' texts, representations of sexuality and gender often function at an unconscious level which reinforces the dominant hegemonic worldview (8). This is, says Parsons, 'ideology's most powerful aspect, its hidden nature and the subtley of its messages' and the job of children's literary criticism is to 'identify the ideological tensions in the texts we offer to children and balance these kinds of representations appropriately' and to encourage a society in which alternative sexualities are accepted and not alienated by social structures (38).
Untitled Lynda Jones , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The School Librarian , Summer vol. 49 no. 2 2001; (p. 76)

— Review of Bob the Builder and the Elves Emily Rodda , 1998 single work children's fiction
The Children's Book Council of Australia Annual Awards 1999 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 43 no. 3 1999; (p. 3-12)
Untitled Judy Moss , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 43 no. 1 1999; (p. 25)

— Review of Bob the Builder and the Elves Emily Rodda , 1998 single work children's fiction
Untitled Rayma Turton , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 13 no. 4 1998; (p. 35)

— Review of Bob the Builder and the Elves Emily Rodda , 1998 single work children's fiction
Untitled Judy Moss , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 43 no. 1 1999; (p. 25)

— Review of Bob the Builder and the Elves Emily Rodda , 1998 single work children's fiction
Untitled Rayma Turton , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 13 no. 4 1998; (p. 35)

— Review of Bob the Builder and the Elves Emily Rodda , 1998 single work children's fiction
Untitled Lynda Jones , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The School Librarian , Summer vol. 49 no. 2 2001; (p. 76)

— Review of Bob the Builder and the Elves Emily Rodda , 1998 single work children's fiction
The Children's Book Council of Australia Annual Awards 1999 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 43 no. 3 1999; (p. 3-12)
Construction Sites of Sexual Identity : A Reading of Emily Rodda's Bob the Builder and the Elves Elizabeth Parsons , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 11 no. 3 2001; (p. 32-38)
Parsons offers a comprehensive critique of gender roles in Emily Rodda's Bob the Builder and the Elves, and claims that the narrative is 'profoundly conservative' in its underlying promotion of heterosexual ideology (34-35). She points out that while children's literature has usually been perceived as 'innocent' of sexual politics, 'no text is innocent of ideology' and goes on to argue that in Rodda's text, '...the story's correlation of heterosexuality with correctness, normality and 'happily ever after' borders on the homophobic' (32). In his influential text, Language and Ideology in Children's Fiction, John Stephens says that literature is used to teach children 'how to live in the world' and in childrens' texts, representations of sexuality and gender often function at an unconscious level which reinforces the dominant hegemonic worldview (8). This is, says Parsons, 'ideology's most powerful aspect, its hidden nature and the subtley of its messages' and the job of children's literary criticism is to 'identify the ideological tensions in the texts we offer to children and balance these kinds of representations appropriately' and to encourage a society in which alternative sexualities are accepted and not alienated by social structures (38).
Last amended 1 Mar 2017 16:07:47
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