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y separately published work icon The Crooked Snake single work   children's fiction   children's   adventure  
Issue Details: First known date: 1955... 1955 The Crooked Snake
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A group of children set up a club to pursue their favourite project: keeping vandals out of the nearby national park.

Notes

  • Also published in braille and sound recording formats.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Hutchinson ,
      1973 .
      image of person or book cover 1118658131908181881.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 153p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 0091145708
Alternative title: Die krumme Schlange
Language: German

Works about this Work

Relationships to the Bush in Nan Chauncy’s Early Novels for Children Susan Sheridan , Emma Maguire , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'In the 1950s, bush settings were strong favourites for children’s novels, which often took the form of a generic mix of adventure story and bildungsroman, novel of individual development. In using bush settings to take up the environmental concerns of the period, the early novels of Wrightson and Chauncy added a new dimension to traditional settler images of rural life as central to Australian national identity. The bush is loved for its beauty and revered as a source of knowledge and character building, rather than being represented as an antagonist which must be overcome or domesticated. In this respect, Chauncy in particular anticipates later ecological concerns in writing for children.' (Publication abstract)
Anna Beth McCormack : Hartnett, Jinks and Honey Anna Beth McCormack , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Lu Rees Archives Notes, Books and Authors , no. 32 2010; (p. 19)
Patricia Wrightson : At the Edge of Australian Vision Walter McVitty , 1981 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Innocence and Experience : Essays on Contemporary Australian Children's Writers 1981; (p. 99-130)
Anna Beth McCormack : Hartnett, Jinks and Honey Anna Beth McCormack , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Lu Rees Archives Notes, Books and Authors , no. 32 2010; (p. 19)
Patricia Wrightson : At the Edge of Australian Vision Walter McVitty , 1981 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Innocence and Experience : Essays on Contemporary Australian Children's Writers 1981; (p. 99-130)
Relationships to the Bush in Nan Chauncy’s Early Novels for Children Susan Sheridan , Emma Maguire , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'In the 1950s, bush settings were strong favourites for children’s novels, which often took the form of a generic mix of adventure story and bildungsroman, novel of individual development. In using bush settings to take up the environmental concerns of the period, the early novels of Wrightson and Chauncy added a new dimension to traditional settler images of rural life as central to Australian national identity. The bush is loved for its beauty and revered as a source of knowledge and character building, rather than being represented as an antagonist which must be overcome or domesticated. In this respect, Chauncy in particular anticipates later ecological concerns in writing for children.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 27 May 2014 11:03:30
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