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Issue Details: First known date: 1982... 1982 Intruders in the Bush : The Australian Quest for Identity
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,:Oxford University Press , 1982 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Bushman Legend, Eleanor Hodges , 1982 single work criticism (p. 3-13)
The Pioneer Legend, J. B. Hirst , 1982 single work criticism (p. 14-37)
Sydney and the Bush: An Urban Context for the Australian Legend, Graeme Davison , 1982 single work criticism (p. 109-130)
Mateship and Egalitarianism: The Failure of Upper Middle-Class Nerve, John Carroll , 1982 single work criticism (p. 143-153)
Australian Drama: Images of a Society, Peter Fitzpatrick , 1982 single work criticism (p. 157-167)
Patrick White's Australia, Veronica Brady , 1982 single work criticism (p. 192-205)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Pain of Belonging Xavier Pons , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal Australians and Other 'Others' 2014; (p. 189-202)

'The title of this chapter is of course a not-so-subtle take on Germaine Greer's phrase "the pain of unbelonging," which gives its title to the collection of essays edited by Sheila Collingwood-Whittick,' to which our co-editor Sue Ryan contributed. It refers to the sense of alienation, dislocation and bewilderment experienced by the European colonists of Australia - what Sheila Collingwood-Whittick called "the colonizer's absolute unfamiliarity with the alien space of the colony [...] their overwhelming sense of estrangement." It is an experience that has often been highlighted by writers and critics - two examples that come to mind are John Carroll's collection of essays Intruders in the Bush (a title that epitomizes the book's argument) and Les Murray's assertion, in his poem "Noonday Axeman," that "It will be centuries / Before many men are truly at home in this country." The non-Indigenous population of Australia is as it were doomed to grope its way, sometimes in a most painful manner, towards a sense of belonging, achieving what is rightly regarded as "a consummation devoutly to be wished," though it may be permanently out of reach if Greer is correct in saying that "for a gubba [white] in Australia there can be no belonging."' (Introduction)
 

'My Head Cook...Appeared in an Evening Dress of Black Net and Silver' : (Re)Viewing Colonial Western Australians through Travellers' Imaginings Cindy Lane , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Melbourne Historical Journal , no. 39 2011; (p. 175-196)
'Did travel writers who observed the white European population in Western Australia in the latter half of the nineteenth century feel that they 'stood [a]mong them but not of them', and to what extent were their ideas preconceived? This article examines how contemporary thought and ideology influenced travellers' attitudes towards white Western Australian society between 1850 and 1914. In witting about the colonists, travellers' observations shaped, and were shaped by, the assumptions, ambitions, and ideologies of the institutions they represented, and those already existing in Western Australian society.' (p. 175)
Intruders in the Bush : Women in Male Domains Andreas Gaile , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rewriting History : Peter Carey's Fictional Biography of Australia 2010; (p. 253-284)
'Intruders in the Bush is the title of John Carroll's study about transplanted cultures attempting to find 'a psychological, even a spiritual, home in Australia. It is a history of a people indruding into an alien land. The title of Carroll's book will serve as a motto for the following analysis of the way in which a number of Carey's female characters intrude into those areas of Australian public and private live traditionally reserved for males.' (p. 253)
Untitled David Callahan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Studies , November no. 9 1995; (p. 142-144)

— Review of Intruders in the Bush : The Australian Quest for Identity 1982 anthology criticism
Legends of Australian Identity Geoffrey Bolton , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Meridian , May vol. 2 no. 1 1983; (p. 47-51)

— Review of Intruders in the Bush : The Australian Quest for Identity 1982 anthology criticism
Legends of Australian Identity Geoffrey Bolton , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Meridian , May vol. 2 no. 1 1983; (p. 47-51)

— Review of Intruders in the Bush : The Australian Quest for Identity 1982 anthology criticism
Untitled David Callahan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Studies , November no. 9 1995; (p. 142-144)

— Review of Intruders in the Bush : The Australian Quest for Identity 1982 anthology criticism
Intruders in the Bush : Women in Male Domains Andreas Gaile , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rewriting History : Peter Carey's Fictional Biography of Australia 2010; (p. 253-284)
'Intruders in the Bush is the title of John Carroll's study about transplanted cultures attempting to find 'a psychological, even a spiritual, home in Australia. It is a history of a people indruding into an alien land. The title of Carroll's book will serve as a motto for the following analysis of the way in which a number of Carey's female characters intrude into those areas of Australian public and private live traditionally reserved for males.' (p. 253)
'My Head Cook...Appeared in an Evening Dress of Black Net and Silver' : (Re)Viewing Colonial Western Australians through Travellers' Imaginings Cindy Lane , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Melbourne Historical Journal , no. 39 2011; (p. 175-196)
'Did travel writers who observed the white European population in Western Australia in the latter half of the nineteenth century feel that they 'stood [a]mong them but not of them', and to what extent were their ideas preconceived? This article examines how contemporary thought and ideology influenced travellers' attitudes towards white Western Australian society between 1850 and 1914. In witting about the colonists, travellers' observations shaped, and were shaped by, the assumptions, ambitions, and ideologies of the institutions they represented, and those already existing in Western Australian society.' (p. 175)
The Pain of Belonging Xavier Pons , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Aboriginal Australians and Other 'Others' 2014; (p. 189-202)

'The title of this chapter is of course a not-so-subtle take on Germaine Greer's phrase "the pain of unbelonging," which gives its title to the collection of essays edited by Sheila Collingwood-Whittick,' to which our co-editor Sue Ryan contributed. It refers to the sense of alienation, dislocation and bewilderment experienced by the European colonists of Australia - what Sheila Collingwood-Whittick called "the colonizer's absolute unfamiliarity with the alien space of the colony [...] their overwhelming sense of estrangement." It is an experience that has often been highlighted by writers and critics - two examples that come to mind are John Carroll's collection of essays Intruders in the Bush (a title that epitomizes the book's argument) and Les Murray's assertion, in his poem "Noonday Axeman," that "It will be centuries / Before many men are truly at home in this country." The non-Indigenous population of Australia is as it were doomed to grope its way, sometimes in a most painful manner, towards a sense of belonging, achieving what is rightly regarded as "a consummation devoutly to be wished," though it may be permanently out of reach if Greer is correct in saying that "for a gubba [white] in Australia there can be no belonging."' (Introduction)
 

Last amended 12 Mar 2002 16:05:31
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