3477712266500479532.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y A Bastard Like Me single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1975... 1975 A Bastard Like Me
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

An autobiography of Australia's first Aboriginal university graduate.

Exhibitions

9428942

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney,: Ure Smith , 1975 .
      3477712266500479532.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 199p.
      Description: illus., ports
      ISBN: 0725402563
Language: Japanese
    • Tokyo, Honshu,
      c
      Japan,
      c
      East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
      :
      Kumon Shuppan ,
      1987 .
      Extent: 271p.
      Edition info: Shohan
      Description: illus., and ports.
      Note/s:
      • Titled as: Bastard Like Me. Japanese
      ISBN: 4875763638, 9784875763635

Works about this Work

Aboriginality and Impersonality : Three Australian Indigenous Administrative Memoirs Tim Rowse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Political Lives : Chronicling Political Careers and Administrative Histories 2006; (p. 65-72)

'The Indigenous public servant is a relatively recent phenomenon — a product of the maturing of the programs of assimilation and the inception of the programs of self-determination. That the Indigenous administrative memoir is recent follows from this, but it is also relevant to point out that the genre Indigenous autobiography is itself not yet fifty years old. In this essay, I will tell you about three Indigenous autobiographies in which the authors (all male) have produced an account of themselves partly by reflecting on their times as a public servant. In each case, the theme ‘impersonality’ is prominent, but each time in a different way.'  (Introduction)

Darce Cassidy's Freedom Ride Peter Read , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 1988; (p. 45-53)

'In February 1965 a group of young people, all but one members of Sydney University's Student Action for Aborigines, set off on a tour of a dozen New South Wales towns selected as places where Aborigines were notoriously ill-treated or segregated. The students' purposes were to conduct a sociological survey of conditions, and, where necessary, to hold demonstrations against particular examples of segregation. By the end of a fortnight, Australia's press was covering the daily confrontations, Charles Perkins was a national figure and conditions in rural towns were the subject of urgent debate amongst white citizens and administrators of Aboriginal affairs. Perhaps most important, young Koories in the towns had seen what was possible to achieve by demonstrations and publicity. Today the Freedom Ride is well known as an event, but little is known about the details. Perkins' autobiography A bastard like me is still the only published eye-witness account readily available.' (Introduction)

A Bastard Like Me 1975 single work review
— Appears in: Identity , October vol. 2 no. 6 1975; (p. 27)

— Review of A Bastard Like Me Charles Perkins 1975 single work autobiography
A Bastard Like Me 1975 single work review
— Appears in: Identity , October vol. 2 no. 6 1975; (p. 27)

— Review of A Bastard Like Me Charles Perkins 1975 single work autobiography
Darce Cassidy's Freedom Ride Peter Read , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 1988; (p. 45-53)

'In February 1965 a group of young people, all but one members of Sydney University's Student Action for Aborigines, set off on a tour of a dozen New South Wales towns selected as places where Aborigines were notoriously ill-treated or segregated. The students' purposes were to conduct a sociological survey of conditions, and, where necessary, to hold demonstrations against particular examples of segregation. By the end of a fortnight, Australia's press was covering the daily confrontations, Charles Perkins was a national figure and conditions in rural towns were the subject of urgent debate amongst white citizens and administrators of Aboriginal affairs. Perhaps most important, young Koories in the towns had seen what was possible to achieve by demonstrations and publicity. Today the Freedom Ride is well known as an event, but little is known about the details. Perkins' autobiography A bastard like me is still the only published eye-witness account readily available.' (Introduction)

Aboriginality and Impersonality : Three Australian Indigenous Administrative Memoirs Tim Rowse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Political Lives : Chronicling Political Careers and Administrative Histories 2006; (p. 65-72)

'The Indigenous public servant is a relatively recent phenomenon — a product of the maturing of the programs of assimilation and the inception of the programs of self-determination. That the Indigenous administrative memoir is recent follows from this, but it is also relevant to point out that the genre Indigenous autobiography is itself not yet fifty years old. In this essay, I will tell you about three Indigenous autobiographies in which the authors (all male) have produced an account of themselves partly by reflecting on their times as a public servant. In each case, the theme ‘impersonality’ is prominent, but each time in a different way.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 1 Jun 2015 12:10:00
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