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y separately published work icon The High Commissioner single work   novel   crime   detective  
Is part of Scobie Malone Jon Cleary , 1954 series - author novel (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1966... 1966 The High Commissioner
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Adaptations

form y separately published work icon Nobody Runs Forever Wilfred Greatorex , ( dir. Ralph Thomas ) Los Angeles London : American Broadcasting Corporation Rank Organisation , 1968 Z1688141 1968 single work film/TV

Australian detective Scobie Malone is sent to England with an arrest warrant for an Australian citizen. The suspect, Sir James Quentin, is wanted in connection with an old murder. However, Quentin is currently acting as high commissioner for high-level international peace talks, and with the negotiations too sensitive to be disturbed, Malone ends up watching Quentin instead. It soon becomes apparent to the policeman that a plot is being hatched to bring the talks to an end, and that Quentin is very likely a target for assassination.

Notes

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Serialised by: The Australian Women's Weekly 1933 periodical (215 issues)
Notes:
Serialised in The Australian Women's Weekly, in 3 weekly instalments, between 11 and 18 January 1967.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Collins ,
      1966 .
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      William Morrow ,
      1966 .
      Alternative title: The High Commissioner : A Novel
      Extent: 284p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Collins ,
      1968 .
      Extent: 223p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fontana ,
      1972 .
      Extent: 223p.

Other Formats

  • Also braille, sound recording and large print.

Works about this Work

Issues of Class and Gender in Australian Crime Fiction : From the 1950s to Today Rachel Franks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 96-111)
In this chapter, Rachel Franks notes ‘‘Australian crime fiction writers imported many types of crime fiction from Britain, including the gothic mystery and the Newgate novel, and from America, including the locked room mystery and the spy story.’ She observes how Australian crime fiction has changed along with the ‘societies that produce it.’ She concludes that for Australian crime fiction to be attractive to mass market and an assured popularity, Australian crime fiction writers must respond ‘to the changing demands of their readers,’ and ‘continue to develop the genre with increasingly sophisticated stories about murderers and those who bring them to justice.’ (Editor’s foreword xii)
Crime Scenes : The Importance of Place in Australian Crime Fiction Michael X. Savvas , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 204-213)
'There are eight million stories about crime fiction. And this is one of them. There are two main ways in which writers use place in crime fiction. The first way is to use place to help create a certain mood and atmosphere. The second way is to use the geographical or physical features of a place imaginatively as a plot device. Sometimes the journeys that are made by characters in crime fiction serve to remind us as readers of these two major devices. Although historically a lot of Australian crime fiction has not focused on place in terms of setting, this is changing as Australia continues to change. (Author's introduction, 204)
Low Sentiments in The High Commissioner Michael X. Savvas , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: London Was Full of Rooms 2006; (p. 183-192)
Low Sentiments in The High Commissioner Michael X. Savvas , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: London Was Full of Rooms 2006; (p. 183-192)
Issues of Class and Gender in Australian Crime Fiction : From the 1950s to Today Rachel Franks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 96-111)
In this chapter, Rachel Franks notes ‘‘Australian crime fiction writers imported many types of crime fiction from Britain, including the gothic mystery and the Newgate novel, and from America, including the locked room mystery and the spy story.’ She observes how Australian crime fiction has changed along with the ‘societies that produce it.’ She concludes that for Australian crime fiction to be attractive to mass market and an assured popularity, Australian crime fiction writers must respond ‘to the changing demands of their readers,’ and ‘continue to develop the genre with increasingly sophisticated stories about murderers and those who bring them to justice.’ (Editor’s foreword xii)
Crime Scenes : The Importance of Place in Australian Crime Fiction Michael X. Savvas , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journeying and Journalling : Creative and Critical Meditations on Travel Writing 2010; (p. 204-213)
'There are eight million stories about crime fiction. And this is one of them. There are two main ways in which writers use place in crime fiction. The first way is to use place to help create a certain mood and atmosphere. The second way is to use the geographical or physical features of a place imaginatively as a plot device. Sometimes the journeys that are made by characters in crime fiction serve to remind us as readers of these two major devices. Although historically a lot of Australian crime fiction has not focused on place in terms of setting, this is changing as Australia continues to change. (Author's introduction, 204)
Last amended 14 Jun 2024 09:28:22
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