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form y separately published work icon The Sound of One Hand Clapping single work   film/TV  
Adaptation of The Sound of One Hand Clapping Richard Flanagan , 1997 single work novel
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 The Sound of One Hand Clapping
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'It's 1968. Sixteen-year-old Sonja leaves her alcoholic father and troubled past, gets on a bus and never looks back. Twenty years later she decides it's time to find out what she was running from. Single and pregnant, she returns to the migrant worker's camp in the Tasmanian Highlands she once called home and finally uncovers the truth she wasn't told as a child.'

Source: Screen Australia. (Sighted: 18/3/2014)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: The Sound of One Hand Clapping : The Film Script
Form: screenplay
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Picador , 2000 .
      Extent: xxiv, 174p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Script for the 1998 film The Sound of One Hand Clapping, directed by Richard Flanagan. Includes the introductory essay 'And What Do You Do Mr Gamble?'

      • Dedication: For all those friends I made making the film of this script, with thanks, with admiration, with wonder. Tempus omnia revelat.

      ISBN: 0330362399

Works about this Work

Tasmania and the Cinema Adrian Danks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , December no. 65 2012;
'Tasmania's intermittent relationship with the cinema dates back before the first feature film made on its rugged West Coast in 1925, Louise Lovely and Wilton Welch's now lost Jewelled Nights. In many ways what we might call "Tasmanian cinema" reflects the sometimes harsh, depopulated landscape of the island itself. Since the 1920s only a small number of feature films - and a larger number of short documentaries largely made by various state and corporate bodies - have been made or shot in Tasmania, with only the children's film They Found a Cave (Andrew Steane, 1962) standing in for the vast period between Norman Dawn's For the Term of His Natural Life in 1927 and John Honey's remarkable Manganinnie in 1980. But Tasmania also has an interesting place in the global imagination of Hollywood during this period, including its status as the actual birthplace of Errol Flynn, the fabricated place of origin of Merle Oberon, and the largely fantastical landscape of the much-loved Warner Bros. cartoon character, The Tasmanian Devil. Warner Bros.' denial of Flynn's origins, MGM's fudging of Oberon's Anglo-Indian ancestry, and the geographic indistinctness and confusion of the original Tasmanian Devil cartoons, highlight a freer approach to what might be termed the "imagination of Tasmania". (Author's introduction)
Rumblings from Australia's Deep South : Tasmanian Gothic On-Screen Emily Bullock , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , 6 April vol. 5 no. 1 2011; (p. 71-80)
'This article examines the current cinematic attention to Tasmania and its stories, with particular attention paid to the Gothic mode. 'Tasmanian Gothic' has become a by-word for the unsettling combination of Tasmania's colonial histories and its harsh landscapes in literature, but its cinematic counterpart has virtually been ignored. It is suggested that Tasmania is experiencing a renaissance on the big screen and it is the Gothic that appears to be the most dominant mode through which it is pictured. The article then charts a history of local Tasmanian Gothic cinematic production, a hybrid vision that tends towards a combination of stylistic, thematic, historical and geographic elements. Tasmanian Gothic cinema refers not simply to productions by Tasmanian film-makers, but to the broader on-screen representation of the island, its culture and histories by a range of local, interstate and international crews. As this article suggests, Gothic cinematic representations of Tasmania are yoked by a number of persistent concerns that act in dialogue with the unique cultural and geographic positioning of Australia's only island state.' (Author's abstract)
Richard Flanagan's Novel and Film 'The Sound of One Hand Clapping' and Australia's Multicultural Film Genre Adi Wimmer , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 48 no. 2003; (p. 127-143) Postcolonial Subjects : Canadian and Australian Perspectives 2004; (p. 179-196)
In Short Debra Adelaide , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 January 2001; (p. 14)

— Review of The Sound of One Hand Clapping Richard Flanagan , 1997 single work film/TV
Paperbacks Fiona Capp , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 18 November 2000; (p. 8)

— Review of The Sound of One Hand Clapping Richard Flanagan , 1997 single work film/TV
Paperbacks Fiona Capp , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 18 November 2000; (p. 8)

— Review of The Sound of One Hand Clapping Richard Flanagan , 1997 single work film/TV
In Short Debra Adelaide , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 January 2001; (p. 14)

— Review of The Sound of One Hand Clapping Richard Flanagan , 1997 single work film/TV
Many Hands Clapping - But No Prize Geoff Kitney , 1998 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24 February 1998;
Richard Flanagan's Novel and Film 'The Sound of One Hand Clapping' and Australia's Multicultural Film Genre Adi Wimmer , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 48 no. 2003; (p. 127-143) Postcolonial Subjects : Canadian and Australian Perspectives 2004; (p. 179-196)
Rumblings from Australia's Deep South : Tasmanian Gothic On-Screen Emily Bullock , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , 6 April vol. 5 no. 1 2011; (p. 71-80)
'This article examines the current cinematic attention to Tasmania and its stories, with particular attention paid to the Gothic mode. 'Tasmanian Gothic' has become a by-word for the unsettling combination of Tasmania's colonial histories and its harsh landscapes in literature, but its cinematic counterpart has virtually been ignored. It is suggested that Tasmania is experiencing a renaissance on the big screen and it is the Gothic that appears to be the most dominant mode through which it is pictured. The article then charts a history of local Tasmanian Gothic cinematic production, a hybrid vision that tends towards a combination of stylistic, thematic, historical and geographic elements. Tasmanian Gothic cinema refers not simply to productions by Tasmanian film-makers, but to the broader on-screen representation of the island, its culture and histories by a range of local, interstate and international crews. As this article suggests, Gothic cinematic representations of Tasmania are yoked by a number of persistent concerns that act in dialogue with the unique cultural and geographic positioning of Australia's only island state.' (Author's abstract)
Tasmania and the Cinema Adrian Danks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , December no. 65 2012;
'Tasmania's intermittent relationship with the cinema dates back before the first feature film made on its rugged West Coast in 1925, Louise Lovely and Wilton Welch's now lost Jewelled Nights. In many ways what we might call "Tasmanian cinema" reflects the sometimes harsh, depopulated landscape of the island itself. Since the 1920s only a small number of feature films - and a larger number of short documentaries largely made by various state and corporate bodies - have been made or shot in Tasmania, with only the children's film They Found a Cave (Andrew Steane, 1962) standing in for the vast period between Norman Dawn's For the Term of His Natural Life in 1927 and John Honey's remarkable Manganinnie in 1980. But Tasmania also has an interesting place in the global imagination of Hollywood during this period, including its status as the actual birthplace of Errol Flynn, the fabricated place of origin of Merle Oberon, and the largely fantastical landscape of the much-loved Warner Bros. cartoon character, The Tasmanian Devil. Warner Bros.' denial of Flynn's origins, MGM's fudging of Oberon's Anglo-Indian ancestry, and the geographic indistinctness and confusion of the original Tasmanian Devil cartoons, highlight a freer approach to what might be termed the "imagination of Tasmania". (Author's introduction)
Last amended 30 Aug 2017 10:16:14
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