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y separately published work icon The Ghost Names Sing : Poems selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 The Ghost Names Sing : Poems
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Contents

* Contents derived from the South Fremantle, Fremantle area, South West Perth, Perth, Western Australia,:Fremantle Press , 1997 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Empty Roomi"The hours go past, the hands", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 9-10)
In the Lao Revolutionary Museum, Vientianei"Under the peeling, cobwebbed ceilings", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 11-13)
After Fifty Yearsi"I counted off the tattoos", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 14)
For Fanny Elizabeth Moorei"Why does it do this?", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 15-16)
In the 1950si"My short uncle", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 17-18)
The Mighty Westsi"Come out of duty, empty handed", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 19-23)
What Use Are the Humanities?i"Sunday looms like a day at the beach,", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 24)
The Mind of Godi"The fear of the iron, inhuman rod", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry
Includes references to Bertrand Russell and Friedrich Nietzsche.
(p. 25)
On Thinking about the Probable Re-election of Richard Courti"On lingering, unforced afternoons spring", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 26-27)
The Second Goingi"Squirming and squirming in the narrowing chair", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 28)
La Bocca, Easteri"Circumnavigated by cheerful buffetings,", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 29-30)
Romanticism in the 1990si"Yachts", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 31-32)
Circus Daysi"When holidays come", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 33-34)
Reality's Crowi"You stand years before I met you", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 35-36)
Sketched by Severn, 28 January 1821i"Clearly he has bent his back", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 37)
As you are, As we arei"To Piramide, the Laurentina line,", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 38-40)
Mt Vernon St, Glebei"Just early morning", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 41)
A Morning Dip (for Vivian Smith)i"I imagine the commune you might have joined,", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 42)
Flowersi"The arc of our mixed colour cars", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 43-44)
152 : Shanghai-Beijingi"I thought naturally, as we've been taught to,", Dennis Haskell , single work poetry (p. 45-46)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Poetry of Dennis Haskell : Stylisation and Elegy David McCooey , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Asiatic , December vol. 13 no. 2 2019; (p. 19-35)
'In this essay I concentrate on the elegiac poetry of the Australian poet Dennis Haskell. I argue that the emphasis in Haskell’s work on the quotidian, clarity of expression and the communication of emotion, has a material effect on the ways in which Haskell approaches the elegiac project: the poetic expression of grief in the face of loss. In the essay I identify three main classes of elegy in Haskell’s oeuvre: elegies for fellow poets (which, after Lawrence Lipking, I call “tombeaux”); the familial elegy; and the spousal elegy. Haskell’s engagement with the genre of the elegy therefore occupies a spectrum between what might be termed “public” elegies, and “intimate” elegies. As I discuss, the intimate elegies indicate a more profound, and sometimes troubled, engagement with the genre of elegy, tipping on occasion in anti -elegy and self-elegy. By undertaking textual analyses of various poems from within the three classes of elegy practised by Haskell, I illustrate the different ways in which he deals with one of the most profound problems that faces an elegist: how to express the profound emotion of grief through the affordances of poetic stylisation.' (Publication abstract)
“A Need for Voices” : The Poetry of Dennis Haskell Kieran Dolin , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Asiatic , December vol. 13 no. 2 2019; (p. 6-18)
'This article presents a critical reading of the poetry of Dennis Haskell. Inspired by the experience of hearing the poet read, it uses the concept of poetic voice as an entry point for critical analysis. Haskell has described his poetic aim as being to “write a poetry that incorporates ideas but never ostentatiously … with as quiet as possible verbal skill, and in a way that evokes the deepest emotions” (Landbridge) . The paper identifies key aspects of voice in the poetry, drawing on arguments by Robert Pinsky and Al Alvarez that voice implies a reaching out to an auditor or reader, and thus has social and cultural dimensions. Attending to both technique and meaning, it first analyses two short lyric poems by Haskell, “One Clear Call” and “The Call,” which explore the power of voice in poetic and pre-linguistic settings respectively. Poetic voice becomes a vehicle of social critique in “Australian Language’s Tribute to the Times,” a bemused satire on the clichéd language of modern politics and economics. In the next section of the paper the focus shifts to his recurrent creative interest in poems of international travel and in particular international flight. The experience of flying is the subject of lucid, practical philosophical reflections in “GA873: The Meaning of Meaning” and “Reality’s Conquests,” while in “As You Are, As We Are” and “Our Century,” Haskell presents vivid intercultural encounters in a voice that is candid, observant and responsive to others.' (Publication abstract)
Writing the Ordinary : Poets in Conversation Isabela Banzon , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 56 no. 1 2011; (p. 35-42)
An Uncertain Smile : Humour in the Poetry of Dennis Haskell Christopher Wortham , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 56 no. 1 2011; (p. 25-31)
Hinterlands Tracy Ryan , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Poetry Review , Spring vol. 89 no. 1 1999; (p. 97-101)

— Review of The Ghost Names Sing : Poems Dennis Haskell , 1997 selected work poetry ; Everything Holy M. T. C. Cronin , 1998 selected work poetry ; The Vigilant Heart Catherine Bateson , 1998 selected work poetry ; The Wild Reply Emma Lew , 1997 selected work poetry
Poetry Helen Horton , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Summer vol. 10 no. 3 1998; (p. 151-153)

— Review of Token Koori Anita Heiss , 1998 selected work poetry ; The Ghost Names Sing : Poems Dennis Haskell , 1997 selected work poetry
Paperbacks Fiona Capp , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 10 January 1998; (p. 6)

— Review of The Ghost Names Sing : Poems Dennis Haskell , 1997 selected work poetry
Domestic Poets Brian Henry , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February-March no. 198 1998; (p. 54-55)

— Review of The Ghost Names Sing : Poems Dennis Haskell , 1997 selected work poetry ; Album of Domestic Exiles Andrew Sant , 1997 selected work poetry
The Limits of Dream Imagery Geoff Page , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 18 April 1998; (p. 22)

— Review of The Ghost Names Sing : Poems Dennis Haskell , 1997 selected work poetry ; The Shadow's Keep John Anderson , 1997 selected work poetry prose
This Enquiry into You John Kinsella , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , Spring vol. 58 no. 3 1998; (p. 250-255)

— Review of The Ghost Names Sing : Poems Dennis Haskell , 1997 selected work poetry
An Uncertain Smile : Humour in the Poetry of Dennis Haskell Christopher Wortham , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 56 no. 1 2011; (p. 25-31)
Writing the Ordinary : Poets in Conversation Isabela Banzon , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , July vol. 56 no. 1 2011; (p. 35-42)
“A Need for Voices” : The Poetry of Dennis Haskell Kieran Dolin , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Asiatic , December vol. 13 no. 2 2019; (p. 6-18)
'This article presents a critical reading of the poetry of Dennis Haskell. Inspired by the experience of hearing the poet read, it uses the concept of poetic voice as an entry point for critical analysis. Haskell has described his poetic aim as being to “write a poetry that incorporates ideas but never ostentatiously … with as quiet as possible verbal skill, and in a way that evokes the deepest emotions” (Landbridge) . The paper identifies key aspects of voice in the poetry, drawing on arguments by Robert Pinsky and Al Alvarez that voice implies a reaching out to an auditor or reader, and thus has social and cultural dimensions. Attending to both technique and meaning, it first analyses two short lyric poems by Haskell, “One Clear Call” and “The Call,” which explore the power of voice in poetic and pre-linguistic settings respectively. Poetic voice becomes a vehicle of social critique in “Australian Language’s Tribute to the Times,” a bemused satire on the clichéd language of modern politics and economics. In the next section of the paper the focus shifts to his recurrent creative interest in poems of international travel and in particular international flight. The experience of flying is the subject of lucid, practical philosophical reflections in “GA873: The Meaning of Meaning” and “Reality’s Conquests,” while in “As You Are, As We Are” and “Our Century,” Haskell presents vivid intercultural encounters in a voice that is candid, observant and responsive to others.' (Publication abstract)
The Poetry of Dennis Haskell : Stylisation and Elegy David McCooey , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Asiatic , December vol. 13 no. 2 2019; (p. 19-35)
'In this essay I concentrate on the elegiac poetry of the Australian poet Dennis Haskell. I argue that the emphasis in Haskell’s work on the quotidian, clarity of expression and the communication of emotion, has a material effect on the ways in which Haskell approaches the elegiac project: the poetic expression of grief in the face of loss. In the essay I identify three main classes of elegy in Haskell’s oeuvre: elegies for fellow poets (which, after Lawrence Lipking, I call “tombeaux”); the familial elegy; and the spousal elegy. Haskell’s engagement with the genre of the elegy therefore occupies a spectrum between what might be termed “public” elegies, and “intimate” elegies. As I discuss, the intimate elegies indicate a more profound, and sometimes troubled, engagement with the genre of elegy, tipping on occasion in anti -elegy and self-elegy. By undertaking textual analyses of various poems from within the three classes of elegy practised by Haskell, I illustrate the different ways in which he deals with one of the most profound problems that faces an elegist: how to express the profound emotion of grief through the affordances of poetic stylisation.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 27 Apr 2004 16:28:14
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