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y separately published work icon Black Hours single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1996... 1996 Black Hours
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Aboriginal and gay, Wayne King felt himself to be an outsider wherever he went in Australia. In Black Hours he tells the powerful and inspirational story of his quest to escape his past and his own sense of isolation.' Source: Publisher's blurb

Exhibitions

6939401

Notes

  • Dedication: I wake and feel the fell of dark not day... - Gerard Manley Hopkins

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1996 .
      Extent: 239p.
      ISBN: 0207190135, 9780207190131
Notes:
Also a sound recording.
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 1998 .
      Extent: 239p.
      Edition info: rev. ed.
      ISBN: 02071966788

Works about this Work

Negotiating the “Drunken Aborigine”: Alcohol in Indigenous Autobiography Sam Dalgarno , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 51-64)

'This article approaches the question of how Aboriginal Australians describe their own experiences of drinking alcohol, sometimes to excess, and how they recover, through a reading of seven autobiographies alongside the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. The evidence contained in these life stories stresses personal factors and adds to the picture we glean from the scholarship, whether academic or governmental, epidemiological, anthropological or historical, which explains Aboriginal drinking habits in more social terms. Thus, the autobiographies themselves make an important intervention into the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. Beyond this, negotiating with the stereotype of the “drunken Aborigine” is unavoidable for Aboriginal people who write about their drinking and these autobiographies represent a challenge to this popular image. This article examines a previously unexamined discourse on Aboriginal drinking that goes some way towards undermining the public representation of a drunken Aboriginal culture while simultaneously giving individual Aboriginal Australians greater voice in describing their past and current experiences.' (Publication abstract)

Aboriginality and Impersonality : Three Australian Indigenous Administrative Memoirs Tim Rowse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Political Lives : Chronicling Political Careers and Administrative Histories 2006; (p. 65-72)

'The Indigenous public servant is a relatively recent phenomenon — a product of the maturing of the programs of assimilation and the inception of the programs of self-determination. That the Indigenous administrative memoir is recent follows from this, but it is also relevant to point out that the genre Indigenous autobiography is itself not yet fifty years old. In this essay, I will tell you about three Indigenous autobiographies in which the authors (all male) have produced an account of themselves partly by reflecting on their times as a public servant. In each case, the theme ‘impersonality’ is prominent, but each time in a different way.'  (Introduction)

Re-Historising 'Racism' : Language, History and Healing in Wayne King's Black Hours Penny Van Toorn , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Altitude , no. 5 2005;
Wayne King Interviewed by Penny Van Toorn Penny Van Toorn (interviewer), 2002 single work interview
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 62 no. 2 2002; (p. 143-149)
Wayne King : A Life in Progress Crusader Hillis , 1998 single work biography
— Appears in: Screaming Hyena : E-Journal of Queer Writing and Review , August no. 16 1998;
Dreams Became Nightmares Tony Maniaty , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 2-3 November 1996; (p. rev 8)

— Review of Black Hours Wayne King , 1996 single work autobiography ; An Australian Son Gordon Matthews , 1996 single work autobiography
All for One, One for All? Peter Read , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , July vol. 3 no. [6] 1998; (p. 18-19)

— Review of Black Hours Wayne King , 1996 single work autobiography
Untitled Stella Lees , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Summer vol. 5 no. 4 1997; (p. 48-49)

— Review of Black Hours Wayne King , 1996 single work autobiography
Wayne King Interviewed by Penny Van Toorn Penny Van Toorn (interviewer), 2002 single work interview
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 62 no. 2 2002; (p. 143-149)
Wayne King : A Life in Progress Crusader Hillis , 1998 single work biography
— Appears in: Screaming Hyena : E-Journal of Queer Writing and Review , August no. 16 1998;
Re-Historising 'Racism' : Language, History and Healing in Wayne King's Black Hours Penny Van Toorn , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Altitude , no. 5 2005;
No Authority : A Whitefella Reads a Blackfella Christos Tsiolkas , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Siglo , Autumn-Winter no. 8 1997; (p. 6-9)
Aboriginality and Impersonality : Three Australian Indigenous Administrative Memoirs Tim Rowse , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Political Lives : Chronicling Political Careers and Administrative Histories 2006; (p. 65-72)

'The Indigenous public servant is a relatively recent phenomenon — a product of the maturing of the programs of assimilation and the inception of the programs of self-determination. That the Indigenous administrative memoir is recent follows from this, but it is also relevant to point out that the genre Indigenous autobiography is itself not yet fifty years old. In this essay, I will tell you about three Indigenous autobiographies in which the authors (all male) have produced an account of themselves partly by reflecting on their times as a public servant. In each case, the theme ‘impersonality’ is prominent, but each time in a different way.'  (Introduction)

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