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Issue Details: First known date: 1995... 1995 Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Sheridan reconsiders the often-neglected women's fiction and journalism from the 1880s to the 1930s and shows that Australian women writers have been excluded from history unless, like Miles Franklin, they engaged with the nationalistic concerns of their male counterparts. She reassesses the romantic fiction and radical journalism of these lesser-known women alongside famous names like Franklin, Gilmore and Prichard, arguing that they write along the faultlines in the dominant discourse of sex, race and nation.

Contents

* Contents derived from the St Leonards, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,:Allen and Unwin , 1995 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Ada Cambridge and the Female Literary Tradition, Susan Sheridan , 1982 single work criticism (p. 3-14)
Gender and Genre in Barbara Baynton's Human Toll, Susan Sheridan , 1989 single work criticism
Sheridan challenges negative evaluations of Human Toll that measure the success of the novel against the well-made realist novel. Sheridan argues that the novel is not disguised autobiography, but employs the narrative devices of late nineteenth century women's fiction while subverting certain elements of that genre. Human Toll destabilizes the conventions of the heroic women's novel, producing a narrative that operates in a Gothic/tragic mode.
(p. 15-26)
'Temper Romantic, Bias Offensively Feminine': Australian Women Writers and Literary Nationalism, Susan Sheridan , 1985 single work criticism (p. 27-35)
Rewriting Romance : The Literary, Sexual and Cultural Politics of Women's Fiction in the 1890, Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism (p. 36-50)
The Romance of Experience : The Early Twentieth Century, Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism (p. 51-68)
Louisa Lawson, Miles Franklin and Feminist Writing, Susan Sheridan , 1988 single work criticism (p. 71-85)
Feminism and Socialism : The Worker in the 1890s, Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism

This chapter focuses on the writing attributed to female contributors to the Worker and the conflicts discernible among them on questions of gender and class politics.

(p. 86-102)
'Mothers of the Race' or 'Working for the Army'? : Women and the Worker, 1908-1931, Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism (p. 103-118)
Wives and Mothers Like Ourselves, Poor Remnants of a Dying Race : Aborigines in Colonial Women's Writing, Susan Sheridan , 1988 single work criticism (p. 121-134)
Mary Gilmore's and Katharine Prichard's Representations of Aborigines, Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism (p. 135-152)
'My dear fellow Australians' : Women Addressing the Nation, Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism (p. 153-165)
Concluding on a Question : Are We Postcolonial Yet?, Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism (p. 166-169)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Animal Handlers : Australian Women Writers on Sexuality and the Female Body Odette Kelada , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms along the Edge , May vol. 26 no. 2012;
'The year 2011 saw the igniting of mass protest around the issue of sexual double standards for women with numerous marches worldwide called 'SlutWalks'. Thousands of women across a range of countries including America, Europe, Britain and Australia took to the streets to defend the right of women to dress and behave freely without stigmatisation and violence. The 'SlutWalks' started in reaction to a local policeman in Toronto telling a class of college students to avoid dressing like 'sluts' if they did not wish to be victimised (SlutWalk Toronto site). The public protest in response to this incident demonstrates resistance to historically embedded discourses that demean women's sexuality and blame women for abuse and rape they suffer. Terms such as 'slut' perpetuate a virgin/whore dichotomy fundamental to the oppression of female sexual self-expression. These marches are a recent example that follows on from a tradition of mass protests for women's sexual equality and right to safety such as 'Reclaim the Night'. Drawing on writing and conversations with poets Dorothy Porter and Gig Ryan, novelists Drusilla Modjeska, Kate Grenville, Carmel Bird and Melissa Lucashenko and playwright, Leah Purcell, this article offers insights into individual creative women's responses to this theme of women's sexuality. I argue that the work and ideas of these women are examples of the unique and powerful dialogue that can happen through a focus on creativity and female stories in Australia.' (Author's introduction)
Conference Tribute : In Honour of Susan Sheridan Barbara Baird , 2010 single work biography
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , September vol. 25 no. 65 2010; (p. 353-359)
Troping the Masculine : Australian Animals, the Nation, and the Popular Imagination Anouk Lang , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 24 no. 1 2010; (p. 5-10)
Stepping Back--Stepping Forward Stephen Cowden , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 60 no. 1 2000; (p. 161-165)
Australian Literature : Points for Departure Gillian Whitlock , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 19 no. 2 1999; (p. 152-162)
Faultlines and Wallflowers Kerryn Goldsworthy , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Southern Review , vol. 29 no. 3 1996; (p. 366-369)

— Review of Wallflowers and Witches : Women and Culture in Australia 1910-1945 1994 anthology criticism biography ; Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s Susan Sheridan , 1995 selected work criticism
Untitled David Carter , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 17 no. 4 1996; (p. 407-411)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon , 1995 single work criticism ; Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s Susan Sheridan , 1995 selected work criticism
Recalling Unhailed Novelists Christopher Bantick , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 6 August 1995; (p. 20)

— Review of Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s Susan Sheridan , 1995 selected work criticism
The Strange Romance of Nationalism and Feminism Allison Craven , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , November vol. 7 no. 3-4 1995; (p. 28-29)

— Review of Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s Susan Sheridan , 1995 selected work criticism
Along the Faultlines of Sex, Race and Nation Joy W. Hooton , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 176 1995; (p. 15-16)

— Review of Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s Susan Sheridan , 1995 selected work criticism
Troping the Masculine : Australian Animals, the Nation, and the Popular Imagination Anouk Lang , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 24 no. 1 2010; (p. 5-10)
Conference Tribute : In Honour of Susan Sheridan Barbara Baird , 2010 single work biography
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , September vol. 25 no. 65 2010; (p. 353-359)
Animal Handlers : Australian Women Writers on Sexuality and the Female Body Odette Kelada , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms along the Edge , May vol. 26 no. 2012;
'The year 2011 saw the igniting of mass protest around the issue of sexual double standards for women with numerous marches worldwide called 'SlutWalks'. Thousands of women across a range of countries including America, Europe, Britain and Australia took to the streets to defend the right of women to dress and behave freely without stigmatisation and violence. The 'SlutWalks' started in reaction to a local policeman in Toronto telling a class of college students to avoid dressing like 'sluts' if they did not wish to be victimised (SlutWalk Toronto site). The public protest in response to this incident demonstrates resistance to historically embedded discourses that demean women's sexuality and blame women for abuse and rape they suffer. Terms such as 'slut' perpetuate a virgin/whore dichotomy fundamental to the oppression of female sexual self-expression. These marches are a recent example that follows on from a tradition of mass protests for women's sexual equality and right to safety such as 'Reclaim the Night'. Drawing on writing and conversations with poets Dorothy Porter and Gig Ryan, novelists Drusilla Modjeska, Kate Grenville, Carmel Bird and Melissa Lucashenko and playwright, Leah Purcell, this article offers insights into individual creative women's responses to this theme of women's sexuality. I argue that the work and ideas of these women are examples of the unique and powerful dialogue that can happen through a focus on creativity and female stories in Australia.' (Author's introduction)
Australian Literature : Points for Departure Gillian Whitlock , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 19 no. 2 1999; (p. 152-162)
Stepping Back--Stepping Forward Stephen Cowden , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 60 no. 1 2000; (p. 161-165)
Last amended 1 Nov 2007 14:16:43
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