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Sturt and the Vultures single work   poetry   "Mincing, mincing we go. And it follows, follows,"
Issue Details: First known date: 1970... 1970 Sturt and the Vultures
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Meanjin Quarterly vol. 29 no. 4 Summer 1970 Z651280 1970 periodical issue 1970 pg. 474-475
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Australian Poetry 1971 Chris Wallace-Crabbe (editor), Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1971 Z63581 1971 anthology poetry Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1971 pg. 110-113
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Poetry Australia no. 56 September 1975 Z633594 1975 periodical issue Francis Webb (1925-1973) Commemorative Issue 1975 pg. 28-29
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Temperament of Generations : Fifty Years of Writing in Meanjin Jenny Lee (editor), Philip Mead (editor), Gerald Murnane (editor), Carlton South : Meanjin Press Melbourne University Press , 1990 Z371555 1990 anthology criticism poetry short story prose correspondence review 'This is a history of Meanjin, told in its own words...Through a selection of previously unpublished correspondence together with some of the path-breaking writings that were first published in Meanjin, this book takes us on a journey through the magazine's own tempestuous history and charts the cross-currents and conflicts of postwar politics and culture.' (Source: back cover) Carlton South : Meanjin Press Melbourne University Press , 1990 pg. 207-208
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Cap and Bells : The Poetry of Francis Webb Francis Webb , Michael Joseph Griffith (editor), James A. McGlade (editor), North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1991 Z352562 1991 selected work poetry drama extract war literature satire North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1991 pg. 236-238

Works about this Work

Tracing the Spectre of Death in Francis Webb's Last Poems Bernadette Brennan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 9 2009;

'In much of Francis Webb's poetry "the tale brings death" ("A Drum for Ben Boyd") but death remains largely off-stage. The poetry eschews the space of death and seems unwilling to explore the possibility of nothingness. There is a significant change, however, that is particularly noticeable in Webb's last three published poems. This paper focuses on the naming of death in "Sturt and the Vultures" but it traces first a progression in Webb's poetry - from "A Death at Winson Green" through "Socrates" and "Rondo Burleske: Mahler's Ninth" - in which the poet seems increasingly ready to contemplate the possibilities of the void.'

'Are You from the Void?' : A Reading of 'Sturt and the Vultures' Noel Rowe , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ethical Investigations : Essays on Australian Literature and Poetics 2008; (p. 126-139)
A negatively theological reading of Webb's poem.
Francis Webb's 'Sturt and the Vultures' : A Note on Sources Robert Sellick , 1974 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 6 no. 3 1974; (p. 310-314)
'Are You from the Void?' : A Reading of 'Sturt and the Vultures' Noel Rowe , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ethical Investigations : Essays on Australian Literature and Poetics 2008; (p. 126-139)
A negatively theological reading of Webb's poem.
Tracing the Spectre of Death in Francis Webb's Last Poems Bernadette Brennan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 9 2009;

'In much of Francis Webb's poetry "the tale brings death" ("A Drum for Ben Boyd") but death remains largely off-stage. The poetry eschews the space of death and seems unwilling to explore the possibility of nothingness. There is a significant change, however, that is particularly noticeable in Webb's last three published poems. This paper focuses on the naming of death in "Sturt and the Vultures" but it traces first a progression in Webb's poetry - from "A Death at Winson Green" through "Socrates" and "Rondo Burleske: Mahler's Ninth" - in which the poet seems increasingly ready to contemplate the possibilities of the void.'

Francis Webb's 'Sturt and the Vultures' : A Note on Sources Robert Sellick , 1974 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 6 no. 3 1974; (p. 310-314)
Last amended 19 Dec 2003 13:25:32
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