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y separately published work icon Preoccupations in Australian Poetry selected work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1965... 1965 Preoccupations in Australian Poetry
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,:Oxford University Press , 1965 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Charles Harpur, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism
Wright examines Harpur's unpublished poetry and prose to demonstrate that (in 1965) Harpur has been underrated for too long because of the slightness and editorial interventions of the 1883 edition of his poetry. Wright argues that Harpur deserves more attention because of the quality of poetry and prose found in his manuscripts and because his life and work personify the attempts of a young Australia to assert its own identity while still exhibiting the influences of English tradition. But Wright recognizes that Harpur's exploration of controversial themes such as physical evolution were not favoured by his only possible audience, partly explaining the unpublished state of much of Harpur's poetry and prose.
(p. 1-19)
Henry Kendall, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism
Compared with Charles Harpur, Wright sees Kendall as a minor poet, pointing to his vast output of poor verse as a testament to this judgement. While Harpur consistently offers poetry of the highest quality, Kendall's frequent "occasional" verse does not support a similar reputation. Wright sees the poem, 'To a Mountain' as Kendall's strongest because it rises to the level of Wordsworth's pantheism with a form and feeling far superior to most of his work.
(p. 20-46)
The Growth and Meaning of the Bush, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 47-58)
Adam Lindsay Gordon and Barcroft Boake, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 57-67)
The Reformist Poets, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 68-79)
Christopher Brennan, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism
Wright offers a very useful introduction to Brennan's poetry, arguing that "There are few figures in literature so convincing, so deep in their conception and so towering in their realization, as Brennan's dreadful and ambiguous figure of Night".
(p. 83-101)
The Affirmation of Hugh McCrae, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 98-110, 131-139)
John Shaw Neilson, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 115-135)
Vision, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 136-144)
Kenneth Slessor : Romantic and Modern, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 145-159)
R.D. FitzGerald, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 160-176)
J.P. McAuley, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 177-188)
A.D. Hope, Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 189-201)
Poets of the 'Forties And Fifties', Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism (p. 202-219)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

“Where’s Home, Ulysses?” Judith Wright in Europe 1937 Sarah Kennedy , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , June vol. 52 no. 2 2017; (p. 331–349)
'When Judith Wright travelled to Europe in the “loaded spring” of February 1937, the 22-year-old poet found herself witness to “a break in the consciousness of Europe”. This article argues that Wright’s experience of being an outsider in Europe at this crucial historical moment had profound implications for her poetics, in the form of a compound and productive series of displacements. Her peripatetic encounters with European cultures-in-crisis caused Wright to despair of Europe as a source of political and creative renewal, and exposed fault lines in her own cultural orientation. Sundered from her Anglophile cultural inheritance, and able to reflect on home with the distance and imaginative ambivalence of an outsider, Wright invoked Ulysses — that archetypal poetic wanderer — whose experience of archipelagic journeying came to express for her the contingencies and hauntedness of Australia’s palimpsestic identity. This essay positions the shifting perspectives and excursive patterns of Wright’s developing poetics in relation to concepts of outsideness and embodiment, drawing on the work of Mikhail Bakhtin and phenomenological philosophies of mind.' (Publication abstract)
Mediation at Work : Tim Winton's Fiction in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 71 no. 1 2011;
'Australian literary production reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically constrained and enabled by a complex system of institutions, individuals, practices and values. However, upon entering a foreign literary market through translation, Australian literary narratives are subjected to further constraints imposed by similar agencies within that culture which mediate the processes of selection, translation and critical reception. My analysis of Tim Winton's Dirt Music (2001) enables a greater understanding of how the writer's use of landscape positions him within that post-Romantic tradition of Australian literature that incorporates major Australian writers of prose and poetry such as Randolph Stow, Patrick White, Judith Wright and Les Murray...' (Author's introduction p. 1)
The Lyric Stance Mark Tredinnick , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Island , Spring no. 126 2011; (p. 60-70)
In this essay Mark Tredinnick advocates the lyric essay.
Judith Wright's Poetry and the Turn to the Post-Pastoral Terry Gifford , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 48 2010;
In this article, Terry Gifford introduces readers to some of the important ecological dimensions and insights of Australian poet Judith Wright.
Untitled Andrew Johnson , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: API Review of Books , November no. 39 2005;

— Review of Preoccupations in Australian Poetry Judith Wright , 1965 selected work criticism
Untitled Andrew Johnson , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: API Review of Books , November no. 39 2005;

— Review of Preoccupations in Australian Poetry Judith Wright , 1965 selected work criticism
Poets as Critics Pamela Oettle , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Poetry Australia , December no. 7 1965; (p. 43-44)

— Review of The Cave and the Spring : Essays on Poetry A. D. Hope , 1961 selected work criticism ; Preoccupations in Australian Poetry Judith Wright , 1965 selected work criticism
Untitled 1964 single work review
— Appears in: Literary Letter , June no. 25 1964; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Preoccupations in Australian Poetry Judith Wright , 1965 selected work criticism
Untitled Adrian Colman , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Poetry Magazine , no. 4 1965; (p. 25-29)

— Review of Preoccupations in Australian Poetry Judith Wright , 1965 selected work criticism
Untitled Gustav Cross , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 17 July 1965; (p. 14)

— Review of Preoccupations in Australian Poetry Judith Wright , 1965 selected work criticism
Judith Wright's Poetry and the Turn to the Post-Pastoral Terry Gifford , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 48 2010;
In this article, Terry Gifford introduces readers to some of the important ecological dimensions and insights of Australian poet Judith Wright.
The Lyric Stance Mark Tredinnick , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Island , Spring no. 126 2011; (p. 60-70)
In this essay Mark Tredinnick advocates the lyric essay.
Mediation at Work : Tim Winton's Fiction in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 71 no. 1 2011;
'Australian literary production reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically constrained and enabled by a complex system of institutions, individuals, practices and values. However, upon entering a foreign literary market through translation, Australian literary narratives are subjected to further constraints imposed by similar agencies within that culture which mediate the processes of selection, translation and critical reception. My analysis of Tim Winton's Dirt Music (2001) enables a greater understanding of how the writer's use of landscape positions him within that post-Romantic tradition of Australian literature that incorporates major Australian writers of prose and poetry such as Randolph Stow, Patrick White, Judith Wright and Les Murray...' (Author's introduction p. 1)
Pelicans, Cycads and Ghost Crabs : Judith Wright and the Poetry of Queensland Martin Duwell , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hot Iron Corrugated Sky : 100 Years of Queensland Writing 2002; (p. 136-147)
y separately published work icon Focus on Judith Wright Bill Scott , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1967 Z8921 1967 single work biography

A look at the life and work of Australian poet Judith Wright.

Last amended 11 Jul 2008 08:47:46
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