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y separately published work icon Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 1897... 1897 Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1897 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Land of Dumb Despairi"Beyond where farthest drought-fires burn,", Will H. Ogilvie , single work poetry (p. ix-x)
From the Far Westi"'Tis a song of the Never Never land-", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 1-3)
Jack's Last Muster, Diamantina River, Western Queenslandi"The first flush of grey light, the herald of daylight", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 4-8)
A Memoryi"Adown the grass-grown paths we strayed,", Surcingle , single work poetry (p. 9-12)
Josephus Rileyi"The rum was rich and rare:", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry humour (p. 13-18)
A Vision Out Westi"Far-reaching downs, a solid sea sunk everlastingly to rest", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry science fiction (p. 19-25)
Jim's Whipi"Yes! there it hangs upon the wall", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 26-28)
The Demon Snow Shoes : A Legend of Kiandrai"The snow lies deep on hill and dale,", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 29-34)
A Valentinei"The Bree was up; the floods were out", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 35-38)
The Box Tree's Lovei"Long time beside the squatter's gate", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 39-47)
A Wayside Queeni"She was born in the season of fire -", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 48-51)
Fogarty's Gini"A sweat-dripping horse and a half-naked myall,", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 52-57)
A Song from a Sandhilli"Drip, drip, drip! It tinkles on the "fly"-", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 58-59)
The Babes in the Bushi"Dozens of damp little curls;", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 60-64)
The Digger's Songi"Scrape the bottom of the hole: gather up the stuff!", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 65-66)
How Polly Paid for Her Keepi"Do I know Polly Brown? Do I know her? Why, damme,", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 67-72)
An Allegoryi"The fight was over, and the battle won.", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 73)
Kitty McCraei"The western sun, ere he sought his lair,", Surcingle , single work poetry (p. 74-79)
'Twixt the Wings of the Yardi"Hear the loud swell of it, mighty pell-mell of it,", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 80-83)
A Songi"I've a kiss from a warmer lover", Barcroft Boake , single work poetry (p. 84-85)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
With a preface (p. v-vii) and a Memoir (p.153-208) by A.G. Stephens and 32 illustrations by F.P. Mahoney, G. Lambert and A.J. Fischer.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Angus and Robertson ,
      1913 .
      Extent: xiv, 223p., [1]p. of platesp.
      Edition info: 2nd revised and enlarged edition
      Description: illus.

Works about this Work

Bringing a Bestseller to Life Craig Munro , 2011-2012 single work essay
— Appears in: SL : State Library of New South Wales Magazine , Summer vol. 4 no. 4 2011-2012; (p. 24-27)
Echoes in the Wilderness : Weird Poetry in Australia Phillip A Ellis , Charles Lovecraft , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australian Weird Fiction , no. 3 2009; (p. 167-178)

In the following symposium, critics Phillip A. Ellis and Charles Lovecraft address several poets and their works within the realm of weird fiction, spotlighting a variety of themes and issues in this sorely neglected field of study. The critics, established poets in their own right, work towards establishing a clear template for further studies and readings which the editors of Studies in Australian Weird Fiction see as essential to readers of weird fiction, within Australian (sic) and abroad.

The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Poems by Barcroft Boake 1897 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 11 September 1897; (p. 507)

— Review of Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , 1897 selected work poetry
New Books and New Editions 1897 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 4 September vol. 55 no. 1439 1897; (p. 24)

— Review of Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , 1897 selected work poetry
Poems by Barcroft Boake 1897 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 11 September 1897; (p. 507)

— Review of Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , 1897 selected work poetry
Untitled 1897 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 15 May vol. 18 no. 900 1897; (p. n. pag.)

— Review of Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , 1897 selected work poetry
Untitled 1897 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Star , 28 August 1897;

— Review of Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , 1897 selected work poetry
Untitled 1897 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 4 September 1897;

— Review of Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , 1897 selected work poetry
Untitled 1897 single work review
— Appears in: The Catholic Press , 4 September 1897;

— Review of Where the Dead Men Lie, and Other Poems Barcroft Boake , 1897 selected work poetry
Echoes in the Wilderness : Weird Poetry in Australia Phillip A Ellis , Charles Lovecraft , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australian Weird Fiction , no. 3 2009; (p. 167-178)

In the following symposium, critics Phillip A. Ellis and Charles Lovecraft address several poets and their works within the realm of weird fiction, spotlighting a variety of themes and issues in this sorely neglected field of study. The critics, established poets in their own right, work towards establishing a clear template for further studies and readings which the editors of Studies in Australian Weird Fiction see as essential to readers of weird fiction, within Australian (sic) and abroad.

The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Bringing a Bestseller to Life Craig Munro , 2011-2012 single work essay
— Appears in: SL : State Library of New South Wales Magazine , Summer vol. 4 no. 4 2011-2012; (p. 24-27)
Barcroft Boake's 'Where the Dead Men Lie and Other Poems' J. Brunton Stephens , 1897 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 October vol. 18 no. 920 1897; (p. 2) Twentieth Century Australian Literary Criticism 1967; (p. 275-279)
Last amended 22 Apr 2015 14:57:48
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