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Nice Work If You Can Get It single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1991... 1991 Nice Work If You Can Get It
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Challenging the Pieties Janet Chimonyo , 1993 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 4 September 1993; (p. 10A)
Against Multiculturalism : Rhetorical Images Sneja Gunew , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 28-43)
Sneja Gunew responds to Dessaix's article by way of four concepts: host, guest/parasite, contagion and disease/noise. She writes: 'In Australia those who occupy the host's chair operate according to the time-honoured imperialist principle that possession is nine-tenths of the law. Those other displaced ones, guests by definition, are anxiety-provoking reminders of the unstable status of their hosts' (35).
Situating Bodies Beth Spencer , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 26-27)
Beth Spencer argues that any debate regarding the ethnic identity of a writer needs to begin with an acknowledgement of the body and how a writer's body is situated by both physical and cultural traits.
Victims and Victimisers Efi Hatzimanolis , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 24-25)
Efi Hatzimanolis argues that Dessaix's and Docker's objections to the terminologies of migrant and multicultural writing are related to anxieties of power reverals. If the feminist writer/critic resists the category of 'victim,' she is repositioned as 'victimiser' (25). Hatzimanolis insists that the debate needs to move beyond this binary thinking.
Cultural Critics and Foreign Agents Nikos Papastergiades , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 19-23)
Nikos Papapastergiadis reads Robert Dessaix's critique of multicultural and migrant writing as an expression of anxiety regarding 'authentic Australian cultural criticism' and the role of 'foreign agents' (22, 23).
Producing 'A Bibliography of Australian Multicultural Writers' Jan Mahyuddin , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 13-18)
This article provides both a discussion of the issues involved in the production of 'A Bibliography of Australian Multicultural Writers' and a rejoinder to Robert Dessaix's criticism of multicultural writing and writing produced in Australia in languages other than English.
Cultural Critics and Foreign Agents Nikos Papastergiades , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 19-23)
Nikos Papapastergiadis reads Robert Dessaix's critique of multicultural and migrant writing as an expression of anxiety regarding 'authentic Australian cultural criticism' and the role of 'foreign agents' (22, 23).
Victims and Victimisers Efi Hatzimanolis , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 24-25)
Efi Hatzimanolis argues that Dessaix's and Docker's objections to the terminologies of migrant and multicultural writing are related to anxieties of power reverals. If the feminist writer/critic resists the category of 'victim,' she is repositioned as 'victimiser' (25). Hatzimanolis insists that the debate needs to move beyond this binary thinking.
Situating Bodies Beth Spencer , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 26-27)
Beth Spencer argues that any debate regarding the ethnic identity of a writer needs to begin with an acknowledgement of the body and how a writer's body is situated by both physical and cultural traits.
Against Multiculturalism : Rhetorical Images Sneja Gunew , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Typereader , Autumn no. 7 1992; (p. 28-43)
Sneja Gunew responds to Dessaix's article by way of four concepts: host, guest/parasite, contagion and disease/noise. She writes: 'In Australia those who occupy the host's chair operate according to the time-honoured imperialist principle that possession is nine-tenths of the law. Those other displaced ones, guests by definition, are anxiety-provoking reminders of the unstable status of their hosts' (35).
232-240 Nice Work If You Can Get Itsmall AustLit logo
22-28 Nice Work If You Can Get Itsmall AustLit logo Australian Book Review
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