y Beyond the Western Rivers single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1955... 1955 Beyond the Western Rivers
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Notes

  • Sequel to No Roads Go By.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

“Nothing but land” : Women’s Narratives, Gardens, and the Settler-Colonial Imaginary in the US West and Australian Outback (International) assertion Tom Lynch , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Western American Literature , vol. 48 no. 4 2014; (p. 374-399)

— Review of The Road from Coorain Jill Ker Conway 1989 single work autobiography ; No Roads Go By Myrtle Rose White 1932 single work autobiography ; Beyond the Western Rivers Myrtle Rose White 1955 single work autobiography

'This essay applies ecocriticism, informed by a transnational, settler-colonial theory, to a comparative analysis of texts by three US and three Australian women authors. Through an examination of both “wild” and domestic landscapes, the essay works to establish how these authors manifest the “settler-colonial imaginary” through their glorification of the process of establishing English-style gardens on homesteads founded in territory depicted as an “unland.” The essay reads the insistent use of a “nothing but” construction in descriptions of uncultivated land in both the Australian and US texts as signifying the literary imagining of the “unland” of the colonized territory, a discursive clearing of the land, as it were, to make room for settlement. From there, it proceeds to compare and contrast the different ways in which these texts imagined settlers’ occupation of land as an ecological struggle to wrest an arid or semi-arid landscape into a space amenable for the production of an English garden—the symbol of the settler-colonial project’s ultimate success. It then discusses texts by settler women in both Australia and the United States that imagine settlement in a more ecologically sustainable way, signaling a potential “counter-colonial” gesture of reconciliation with place.' [publisher's summary]

Outback Boyhood 1955 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 November vol. 76 no. 3951 1955; (p. 2)

— Review of Beyond the Western Rivers Myrtle Rose White 1955 single work autobiography
Untitled Vance Palmer , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 14 no. 4 1955; (p. 584-585)

— Review of No Roads Go By Myrtle Rose White 1932 single work autobiography ; I Can Jump Puddles Alan Marshall 1955 single work autobiography ; Beyond the Western Rivers Myrtle Rose White 1955 single work autobiography
Untitled Vance Palmer , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 14 no. 4 1955; (p. 584-585)

— Review of No Roads Go By Myrtle Rose White 1932 single work autobiography ; I Can Jump Puddles Alan Marshall 1955 single work autobiography ; Beyond the Western Rivers Myrtle Rose White 1955 single work autobiography
Outback Boyhood 1955 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 November vol. 76 no. 3951 1955; (p. 2)

— Review of Beyond the Western Rivers Myrtle Rose White 1955 single work autobiography
“Nothing but land” : Women’s Narratives, Gardens, and the Settler-Colonial Imaginary in the US West and Australian Outback (International) assertion Tom Lynch , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Western American Literature , vol. 48 no. 4 2014; (p. 374-399)

— Review of The Road from Coorain Jill Ker Conway 1989 single work autobiography ; No Roads Go By Myrtle Rose White 1932 single work autobiography ; Beyond the Western Rivers Myrtle Rose White 1955 single work autobiography

'This essay applies ecocriticism, informed by a transnational, settler-colonial theory, to a comparative analysis of texts by three US and three Australian women authors. Through an examination of both “wild” and domestic landscapes, the essay works to establish how these authors manifest the “settler-colonial imaginary” through their glorification of the process of establishing English-style gardens on homesteads founded in territory depicted as an “unland.” The essay reads the insistent use of a “nothing but” construction in descriptions of uncultivated land in both the Australian and US texts as signifying the literary imagining of the “unland” of the colonized territory, a discursive clearing of the land, as it were, to make room for settlement. From there, it proceeds to compare and contrast the different ways in which these texts imagined settlers’ occupation of land as an ecological struggle to wrest an arid or semi-arid landscape into a space amenable for the production of an English garden—the symbol of the settler-colonial project’s ultimate success. It then discusses texts by settler women in both Australia and the United States that imagine settlement in a more ecologically sustainable way, signaling a potential “counter-colonial” gesture of reconciliation with place.' [publisher's summary]

Last amended 13 Dec 2007 14:49:43
Subjects:
  • New South Wales,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
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