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y separately published work icon The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories selected work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1972... 1972 The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories
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Notes

  • Republication of Billy Borker Yarns Again with the addition of title story. Also omits Semmler's introduction to earlier selection.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,:Nelson , 1972 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Great Australian Lover, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 1-3)
The Battler Who Threw Four Heads at Tommo's Two-Up School, Frank Hardy , single work short story (p. 4-10)
The World's Worst Cricket Umpire, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 11-16)
The World's Worst Urger, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 17-24)
There's None So Blind As Them That Cannot Read, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 25-29)
Never Judge a Man by the Clothes He Wears, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 31-35)
The World's Greatest Grog Gargler, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 36-42)
Democracy Has to Work Both Ways, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 43-47)
The Smart Bookmaker From The South Who Took His Horse To The Darwin Races, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 48-53)
Greed and Revenge Are a Terrible Mixture, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 54-60)
Cheats Never Prosper - If They've Got Principles, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 69-75)
Why a Raffle Is Called a Swindle in Darwin, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 76-80)
How the Barefoot Booter from Borroloola Kicked Seven Goals One Behind in the Last Quarter, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 81-87)
The Unluckiest Man in the World, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 88-92)
The Untimely Death of Chook Henderson, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 93-98)
Punishment Is Not the Way to Stop Crime, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 99-103)
How Darwin Beat the Pommies, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 104-108)
The Legend of the Two Valuable Dogs, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 109-113)
A Friend of Today Is an Enemy of Tomorrow, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 114-118)
One Man's Damper Is Another Man's Soup, Frank Hardy , single work short story humour (p. 119-123)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Portrayal of Otherness : John Steinbeck's Tortilla Flat and Frank Hardy's The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Danica Cerce , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Comparatist , May vol. 36 no. 2012; (p. 196-206)
'Critics such as Marian Galik have stressed the importance of drawing literary parallels between literatures either of the same or different epochs, and sometimes traditionally and spatially very distant from each other. According to Galik, such study is necessary and productive because it not only provides us with new knowledge and allows for "deeper understanding in various areas of literature, its history, theory, and criticism," but it also enables a more comprehensive insight into the study of related literary facts across cultural boundaries (Galik 99). In light of this view, my essay offers a comparative analysis of John Steinbeck's accounts of "paisanos"—as the American 1962 Nobel Prize winner refers to the mixed-blood inhabitants of California in the novel Tortilla Flat (1935)—and a collection of anecdotes about the Australian "battler," The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories (1967) by the Australian novelist and story-teller, Frank Hardy. By focusing on the similarities between the writers' characterization in these works, which differs significantly from the positive portrayals in their central novels in that both of them stress the protagonists' laziness, stupidity, parasitism and even promiscuity, I attempt to ascertain the grounds for reconciliation of these two different sides of Steinbeck and Hardy. In this sense, this discussion aims to provide additional evidence that reading literature comparatively leads to new insights and recognitions.
[Review] The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories R. Park , 1973 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Telegraph , 14 January 1973; (p. 23)

— Review of The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Frank Hardy , 1972 selected work short story
[Review] The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Les Murray , 1973 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 10 February 1973; (p. 18)

— Review of The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Frank Hardy , 1972 selected work short story
[Review] The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories J. Miles , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 23 December 1972; (p. 16)

— Review of The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Frank Hardy , 1972 selected work short story
[Review] The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories J. Miles , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 23 December 1972; (p. 16)

— Review of The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Frank Hardy , 1972 selected work short story
[Review] The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Les Murray , 1973 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 10 February 1973; (p. 18)

— Review of The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Frank Hardy , 1972 selected work short story
[Review] The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories R. Park , 1973 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Telegraph , 14 January 1973; (p. 23)

— Review of The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Frank Hardy , 1972 selected work short story
The Portrayal of Otherness : John Steinbeck's Tortilla Flat and Frank Hardy's The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories Danica Cerce , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Comparatist , May vol. 36 no. 2012; (p. 196-206)
'Critics such as Marian Galik have stressed the importance of drawing literary parallels between literatures either of the same or different epochs, and sometimes traditionally and spatially very distant from each other. According to Galik, such study is necessary and productive because it not only provides us with new knowledge and allows for "deeper understanding in various areas of literature, its history, theory, and criticism," but it also enables a more comprehensive insight into the study of related literary facts across cultural boundaries (Galik 99). In light of this view, my essay offers a comparative analysis of John Steinbeck's accounts of "paisanos"—as the American 1962 Nobel Prize winner refers to the mixed-blood inhabitants of California in the novel Tortilla Flat (1935)—and a collection of anecdotes about the Australian "battler," The Great Australian Lover and Other Stories (1967) by the Australian novelist and story-teller, Frank Hardy. By focusing on the similarities between the writers' characterization in these works, which differs significantly from the positive portrayals in their central novels in that both of them stress the protagonists' laziness, stupidity, parasitism and even promiscuity, I attempt to ascertain the grounds for reconciliation of these two different sides of Steinbeck and Hardy. In this sense, this discussion aims to provide additional evidence that reading literature comparatively leads to new insights and recognitions.
Last amended 13 Jul 2004 12:46:01
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