AustLit logo
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Toowoomba, Toowoomba area, Darling Downs, Queensland,:Association for the Study of Australian Literature , 1998 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Polylogue : Writers Theorising, a Performance, Alison Bartlett , single work drama criticism (p. 7-26)
Translations : Maternal Debt in the Language of Ania Walwicz's 'Red Roses', Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 27-50)
Reading Bodies, Alison Bartlett , single work short story criticism (p. 51-57)
The Ailing Body : Women, Medical Discourse and Power in Margaret Coombs's 'The Best Man for this Sort of Thing', Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 59-74)
A Fairytale Body? : Writing a Way Out of Anorexia in Fiona Place's 'Cardboard : The Strength Thereof and Other Related Matters', Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 75-90)
No End to Romance? Sexual Economies in Inez Baranay's 'Between Careers', Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 91-104)
Could Irigaray be Eurocentric?: Exploring the Desert, Epilepsy and Lesbian Writing in Susan Hawthorne's 'The Falling Woman' Land of Plenty : The Narrative Politics of the Desert in Susan Hawthorne's 'The Falling Woman', Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 105-120)
Writing Desire, Alison Bartlett , single work short story criticism (p. 121-127)
The Daughter's Seduction : Sue Woolfe's 'Painted Woman', Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 129-147)
The Art of Desire : Davida Allen's 'Close to the Bone : The Autobiography of Vicki Myers', Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 149-169)
Performing Bodies, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 171-177)
Reading Conclusions, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism (p. 179-181)
Interview with Ania Walwicz, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism biography (p. 184-197)
Interview with Margaret Coombs, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism biography (p. 198-207)
Interview with Fiona Place, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism biography (p. 208-214)
Interview with Inez Baranay, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism biography (p. 215-221)
Interview with Susan Hawthorne, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism biography (p. 222-230)
Interview with Sue Woolfe, Alison Bartlett , single work criticism biography (p. 231-240)
Interview with Davida Allen, Alison Bartlett , single work interview (p. 241-249)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Theorising the Madwoman : Fictocritical Incursions - A Performance Laura Deane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'‘Theorising the madwoman : fictocritical incursions - a performance’ is an intervention into the politics of naming and writing about women’s madness in literature. Using fictocritical tactics, this article stages a dialogue between the madwoman and the critic to make visible ‘the fiction of the disembodied scholar’ deployed in textual criticism. Sometimes speaking as the madwoman, sometimes as the feminist critic, I aim to destabilise the voice of the objective scholar, while continuing to lay some claim to it. Polyvocal in arrangement, discordant and offbeat in its strategies, and fictocritical in its tactics and stylistics, this article is an incursion into, rather than an interpretation of, women’s madness. Using a hybrid of fictional strategies, feminist scholarship, and personal experience, I allow the madwoman to interrupt, challenge and resist the interpretive project, by careening into it. Provisional, disorderly and subversive, fictocriticism offers a way of thinking through, rather than thinking about women’s madness. It seems particularly suited to an investigation of the madwoman in literature, as it dramatises the very disorder and instability the madwoman is said to embody.' (Author's abstract)
Feminism and Australian Literature Susan Sheridan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 92-103)
'Susan Sheridan traces the influence and varieties of feminism and feminist critique in Australia, arguably the major influence in transforming Australian literary studies in the 1980s and 1990s.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Review Tseen-Ling Khoo , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Aumla , May no. 93 2000; (p. 120-122)

— Review of Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Review D. Hunn , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , vol. 14 no. 30 1999; (p. 437-438)

— Review of Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Untitled Antonio Jose Simoes Da Silva , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , Autumn vol. 44 no. 1 1999; (p. 130-133)

— Review of Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Untitled Shane Rowlands , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 19 no. 2 1999; (p. 233-235)

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose ; Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Fictocritical Soup Sylvia Martin , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , vol. 11 no. 1999; (p. 8-9)

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose ; Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
[Review] Jamming the Machinery Bronwen Levy , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , Summer vol. 10 no. 3 1998; (p. 144-146)

— Review of Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Untitled Margaret Henderson , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 58 1998; (p. 199-200)

— Review of Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Disruptive Tenancy Gail Jones , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December-January (1998-1999) no. 207 1998; (p. 30-31)

— Review of Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Feminism and Australian Literature Susan Sheridan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 92-103)
'Susan Sheridan traces the influence and varieties of feminism and feminist critique in Australia, arguably the major influence in transforming Australian literary studies in the 1980s and 1990s.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Theorising the Madwoman : Fictocritical Incursions - A Performance Laura Deane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'‘Theorising the madwoman : fictocritical incursions - a performance’ is an intervention into the politics of naming and writing about women’s madness in literature. Using fictocritical tactics, this article stages a dialogue between the madwoman and the critic to make visible ‘the fiction of the disembodied scholar’ deployed in textual criticism. Sometimes speaking as the madwoman, sometimes as the feminist critic, I aim to destabilise the voice of the objective scholar, while continuing to lay some claim to it. Polyvocal in arrangement, discordant and offbeat in its strategies, and fictocritical in its tactics and stylistics, this article is an incursion into, rather than an interpretation of, women’s madness. Using a hybrid of fictional strategies, feminist scholarship, and personal experience, I allow the madwoman to interrupt, challenge and resist the interpretive project, by careening into it. Provisional, disorderly and subversive, fictocriticism offers a way of thinking through, rather than thinking about women’s madness. It seems particularly suited to an investigation of the madwoman in literature, as it dramatises the very disorder and instability the madwoman is said to embody.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 22 Jul 2009 14:10:33
X