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y separately published work icon Wildcat Screaming : A Novel single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1992... 1992 Wildcat Screaming : A Novel
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Wildcat is out of prison, but not for long. In this sequel to Wild Cat Falling, Mudrooroo takes us inside the life of the urban Aboriginal. Set in the boom years of Perth bankers and entrepreneurs, we see the same wheeling and dealing from inside Fremantle prison. Wildcat has to survive, and understand the new order, set by the Chief Warder and an ex-Indian Army officer. Soon he too is part of their great creation, The Panopticon Prison Reform Society. (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Aboriginal Affair(s): Reflections on the Life of Mudrooroo Eva Rask Knudsen , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: LINQ , December no. 39 2012; (p. 105-115)

'The article reviews the controversial 'Mudrooroo Affair' with reference to unpublished work by Mudrooroo in which he comments on the public debate about his rights to define himself as Aboriginal and, by extension, have his work credited as Aboriginal. Such work makes it pertinent to review Mudrooroo's creative output since 1965 as literary experiments with life writing and to reconsider Mudrooroo's many literary 'performances' from this perspective. They are not only explorations of Aboriginal identity politics over,- the last five decades, but may also be seen as a far more personal investment in exploring Aboriginal identity through a progressively shifting but interrelated series of subjectivities that reflect the writer's own experience and inform his claim to Aboriginality.' (Publication summary)

Les Murray in a Dhoti : Transnationalizing Australian Literature Paul Sharrad , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 39-36)
'India has faced a similar challenge in establishing the serious study of its own writing in English, one made more problematic by the battle not only to overcome ingrained colonial prejudice against that writing as second-hand imitations of British literature, but because of the resistance from nationalist critics championing writing in the autochthonous languages of the subcontinent. The tactical solution amongst academics in Australia has been in part to accept the consolidation of the field in the national context and to look beyond the national to historical complex networks of literary production and circulation under Empire and to current networks of diasporic movements in and out of Australia. Among other things Sharrad shares that the current calibration of research publications in Australia and the allocation of research grants threaten steadily to concentrate resources around a few key international journals and narrow interpretations of the national interest.' (Editor's abstract)
Foucault, Mudrooroo and the Panopticon ; A Study of Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Screaming Sagar Dan , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literature : Identity, Representation and Belonging 2007; (p. 115-124)
Mudrooroo : Crafty Imposter or Rebel with a Cause Maureen Clark , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 21 no. 4 2004; (p. 101-110)
Reality Rights in the Wildcat Trilogy Maureen Clark , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 43-64)
Collapsing Into Himself Suzanne Ruta , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 9 January 1994; (p. 21)

— Review of Wild Cat Falling Colin Johnson , 1965 single work novel ; Wildcat Screaming : A Novel Mudrooroo , 1992 single work novel
Prison Dreaming Raises the Spirits Jack Davis , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 31 October 1992; (p. 8)

— Review of Unbranded Herb Wharton , 1992 single work novel ; Wildcat Screaming : A Novel Mudrooroo , 1992 single work novel
Scruffy Wildcat can't Scratch the Surface Leon Trainor , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17-18 October 1992; (p. rev 7)

— Review of The Edge of Bali Inez Baranay , 1992 single work novel ; Wildcat Screaming : A Novel Mudrooroo , 1992 single work novel ; The Glass Inferno Angelika Fremd , 1992 single work novel
Forecasts Jane Freeman , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , July vol. 72 no. 1028 1992; (p. 40-41)

— Review of Wildcat Screaming : A Novel Mudrooroo , 1992 single work novel
Scream that Shatters Reality Roberta Sykes , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 October 1992; (p. 48)

— Review of Wildcat Screaming : A Novel Mudrooroo , 1992 single work novel ; The Day of the Dog Archie Weller , 1981 single work novel
Reality Rights in the Wildcat Trilogy Maureen Clark , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 43-64)
Mudrooroo : Crafty Imposter or Rebel with a Cause Maureen Clark , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 21 no. 4 2004; (p. 101-110)
Foucault, Mudrooroo and the Panopticon ; A Study of Mudrooroo's Wild Cat Screaming Sagar Dan , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literature : Identity, Representation and Belonging 2007; (p. 115-124)
Les Murray in a Dhoti : Transnationalizing Australian Literature Paul Sharrad , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 39-36)
'India has faced a similar challenge in establishing the serious study of its own writing in English, one made more problematic by the battle not only to overcome ingrained colonial prejudice against that writing as second-hand imitations of British literature, but because of the resistance from nationalist critics championing writing in the autochthonous languages of the subcontinent. The tactical solution amongst academics in Australia has been in part to accept the consolidation of the field in the national context and to look beyond the national to historical complex networks of literary production and circulation under Empire and to current networks of diasporic movements in and out of Australia. Among other things Sharrad shares that the current calibration of research publications in Australia and the allocation of research grants threaten steadily to concentrate resources around a few key international journals and narrow interpretations of the national interest.' (Editor's abstract)
Wrestling with White Spirits : The Uses and Limits of Modernism and Postmodernism in Aboriginal and Native American Literary Contexts J. J. Healy , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian & New Zealand Studies in Canada , December no. 12 1994; (p. 31-50)
Last amended 20 Feb 2017 16:11:58
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  • Perth, Western Australia,
  • 1980s
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