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y separately published work icon The Seal Woman single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1992... 1992 The Seal Woman
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A Danish woman in mourning for her husband returns to Australia in search of understanding.

Notes

  • Epigraph: 'Love is a stone that settled on the seabed under grey water' Derek Walcott - Sea Grapes
  • Sound recording and braille available

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: 海豹女人
Transliterated title: Hai bao nü ren
Language: Chinese

Works about this Work

Australia in Three Books Fiona Wright , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 77 no. 1 2018; (p. 24-26)
Figures of Life: Beverley Farmer's The Seal Woman as an Australian Bioregional Novel Ruth Blair , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bioregional Imagination: Literature, Ecology, and Place, 2012; (p. 164-180)
Literary Transculturations and Modernity : Some Reflections Anne Holden Rønning , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'In an increasingly global world literary and cultural critics are constantly searching for ways in which to analyse and debate texts and artefacts. Postcolonial theories and studies have provided useful tools for analyzing, among others, New Literatures in English and other languages, as well as throwing new light on an understanding of older texts. But today, with the increase in diaspora studies in literature and cultural studies, new ways of looking at texts are paramount, given the complexity of contemporary literature. There is, as Bill Ashcroft writes, a 'strange contrapuntal relationship between identity, history, and nation that needs to be unravelled.' With references to Australian literature, this article will present some reflections on transculturation and modernities, the themes of the Nordic Network of Transcultural Literary Studies, which considers transculturation not as a theory but, 'a matrix through which a set of critical tools and vocabularies can be refined for the study of texts from a localized world, but institutionalised globally' and where , ' the engagement of multiple sites and their routes with the progression of "one modernity" in some way or other inform the aesthetics of transcultural literature.' (Author's introduction)
Cultural Encounters and Hyphenated People Anne Holden Rønning , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 1 no. 2009; (p. 90-96)
'Cultural encounters are a dominant feature of contemporary society. Identities are ever-changing ‘routes’ as Hall and others have stated, so we become insiders and outsiders to our own lives. The manifaceted expression of cultural belonging and its formation is illustrated by examples from Australasian writers who express not only the conflict of belonging to more than one culture, but also its inherent value. Such writers provide the reader with alternative ways of reading culture and illustrate the increasing trend to see ourselves as hyphenated people belonging nowhere specific in a globalised world.' Source: Anne Holden Rønning.
The Significance of Littoral in Beverley Farmer's Novel The Seal Woman Anne Collett , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October/November vol. 24 no. 3-4 2009; (p. 121-132)
This essay 'offers some thoughts on the transformative possibility of the littoral in Beverley Farmer's novel The Seal Woman, and a brief discussion of Farmer's particular deployment of littoral as feminine or even feminist' (121).
Farmer : Words and Worlds Amanda Nettelbeck , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , no. 2 1993; (p. 97-98)

— Review of The Seal Woman Beverley Farmer , 1992 single work novel
The Seal Woman by Beverley Farmer Ann-Marie Priest , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Idiom 23 , November-December vol. 5 no. 2 1992; (p. 71)

— Review of The Seal Woman Beverley Farmer , 1992 single work novel
Poetry is Where You Find It Reba Gostand , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , April vol. 12 no. 1 1993; (p. 63-65)

— Review of Selected Poems 1939-1990 John Blight , 1992 selected work poetry ; Heartland Angelika Fremd , 1992 single work novel ; Fabricating the Self : The Fictions of Jessica Anderson Elaine Barry , 1996 single work criticism ; The Seal Woman Beverley Farmer , 1992 single work novel ; Poems 1959-1989 David Malouf , 1992 selected work poetry ; Central Mischief : Elizabeth Jolley on Writing, Her Past and Herself Elizabeth Jolley , 1992 selected work prose
Language, the Instrument of Fiction Nicolette Stasko , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 53 no. 4 1993; (p. 174-182)

— Review of The Toucher Dorothy Hewett , 1993 single work novel ; The House of Breathing Gail Jones , 1992 selected work short story ; The Seal Woman Beverley Farmer , 1992 single work novel
Characters Adrift Cynthia Blanche , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Quadrant , March vol. 37 no. 3 1993; (p. 84-86)

— Review of Micky Darlin' Victor Kelleher , 1992 single work novel ; The Glass Inferno Angelika Fremd , 1992 single work novel ; The Seal Woman Beverley Farmer , 1992 single work novel ; Love Parts Julian Davies , 1992 single work novel ; Remember Me, Jimmy James Steven Carroll , 1992 single work novel
Eros in Dreamland Beverley Farmer , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , April vol. 66 no. 1 2007; (p. 199-204)
'Novelist and short-story writer Beverley Farmer traces the shifting configurations and intersections of love, desire and intimacy, as reflected in the work of various artists, including her own writings. (Meanjin)
Strutting One's Stuff Xavier Pons , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antithesis , vol. 19 no. 2009; (p. 14-29)
The article highlights the ways in which sexual identity is performed, represented and exhibited in Australian writing and suggests connections between issues of individual identity and the larger question of Australian national identity. Focussing on a spectrum of Australian writing, Pons analyses the literary strategies of this large and growing corpus and its gender-specific variations.
The Significance of Littoral in Beverley Farmer's Novel The Seal Woman Anne Collett , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October/November vol. 24 no. 3-4 2009; (p. 121-132)
This essay 'offers some thoughts on the transformative possibility of the littoral in Beverley Farmer's novel The Seal Woman, and a brief discussion of Farmer's particular deployment of littoral as feminine or even feminist' (121).
Cultural Encounters and Hyphenated People Anne Holden Rønning , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies on Australia , vol. 1 no. 2009; (p. 90-96)
'Cultural encounters are a dominant feature of contemporary society. Identities are ever-changing ‘routes’ as Hall and others have stated, so we become insiders and outsiders to our own lives. The manifaceted expression of cultural belonging and its formation is illustrated by examples from Australasian writers who express not only the conflict of belonging to more than one culture, but also its inherent value. Such writers provide the reader with alternative ways of reading culture and illustrate the increasing trend to see ourselves as hyphenated people belonging nowhere specific in a globalised world.' Source: Anne Holden Rønning.
Literary Transculturations and Modernity : Some Reflections Anne Holden Rønning , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'In an increasingly global world literary and cultural critics are constantly searching for ways in which to analyse and debate texts and artefacts. Postcolonial theories and studies have provided useful tools for analyzing, among others, New Literatures in English and other languages, as well as throwing new light on an understanding of older texts. But today, with the increase in diaspora studies in literature and cultural studies, new ways of looking at texts are paramount, given the complexity of contemporary literature. There is, as Bill Ashcroft writes, a 'strange contrapuntal relationship between identity, history, and nation that needs to be unravelled.' With references to Australian literature, this article will present some reflections on transculturation and modernities, the themes of the Nordic Network of Transcultural Literary Studies, which considers transculturation not as a theory but, 'a matrix through which a set of critical tools and vocabularies can be refined for the study of texts from a localized world, but institutionalised globally' and where , ' the engagement of multiple sites and their routes with the progression of "one modernity" in some way or other inform the aesthetics of transcultural literature.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 17 Nov 2017 13:44:24
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