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Issue Details: First known date: 1978... 1978 Karobran : The Story of an Aboriginal Girl
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

An insight into the treatment and interactions of black, Aboriginal and other women with white society. The narrator highlights her and her fathers life as an Aboriginal sheep shearer. It also highlights the hardships they faced as a single parent family and Claire's experience of being taken away as an Aboriginal child by the policies of the day. The novel also describes her involvement in politics and working towards a better life for all Aboriginal people. (Published posthumously)

Exhibitions

8931289
15517650

Notes

  • Publisher's Note The word "Karobran", the title of this book, is highly appropriate, being a northern New South Wales Aboriginal word meaning together, or togetherness. It was what Monica Clare believed in, and hoped for, and it was the way the Aborigines lived, and the way white people did not live and did not understand. but increasingly people all over the world, particularly young people, are coming to recognise that it is the only way human beings will be able to live at all in the world of tomorrow. the final victory may yet be to the Aborigines.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Alternative Publishing Co-operative , 1978 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Monica Clare , single work criticism
The introduction describes Monica Clare's life experiences of growing up as an adoptee as well as the events that took place later in her life during her first marriage. As an Aboriginal activist she was particulary interested in assimilatory practices both personally and politically. Clare also faced problems of identity problems that led her to committing herself to tireless work in the quest for political and social equality. Her honesty and strong principles enabled her to become a well respected and loved member of both the black and white community.Clare died suddenly on National Aborigines Day, 13th July, 1973.
(p. xi-xiii)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

The Indigenous Australian Novel Peter Minter , Belinda Wheeler , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford History of the Novel in English : The Novel in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the South Pacific Since 1950 2017; (p. 284-299)

'Emerging in the second half of the twentieth century from the traditions of the oldest living cultures on earth - the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia - the Indigenous Australian novel makes a unique contribution to the history of the novel in its contemporary phase...' (Introduction) 

Changes in Tone, Setting, and Publisher : Indigenous Literatures of Australia and New Zealand from the 1980s to Today Per Henningsgaard , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 8 no. 2 2016;
'This article examines four novels written since 1980 by two Aboriginal Australian authors and two Maori authors. Two of the four novels were written near the beginning of this period and feature settings that are contemporary with their publication; The Day of the Dog by Aboriginal Australian author Archie Weller was published in 1981, while Once Were Warriors by Maori author Alan Duff was published in 1990. The other two novels (That Deadman Dance by Aboriginal Australian author Kim Scott and The Trowenna Sea by Maori author Witi Ihimaera) are works of historical fiction written in the last decade.' (Introduction)
Questioning Collaboration : The Past, Present and Future of Cross-Cultural Collaboration in Australian Publishing Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History 2009; (p. 206-236)
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones argues that while editorial style may have changed overtime, the normativity, centrality and invisibility of whiteness continues to impact upon contemporary editorial practices in relation to Aboriginal women's writing.
Literary Links : Monica Clare and Left-Wing Politics Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History 2009; (p. 176-205)
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones examines how the conventional treatment by editors led Aboriginal female authors, such as Clare, into positions that compromised the political, marginal and controversial positons adopted in their works.
Invisible Workers : The Posthumous Editing of Monica Clare's Karobran Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History 2009; (p. 150-175)
Monica Clare's autobiography Karobran was published posthumously. In this chapter, Jennifer Jones examines the editorial process after Monica's death and how this impacted on the original spirit and intent of the author's message regarding Aboriginal issues.
Karobran : The Story of an Aboriginal Girl Louise West , 1979 single work review
— Appears in: Womanspeak , March-April vol. 4 no. 4 1979; (p. 29)

— Review of Karobran : The Story of an Aboriginal Girl Monica Clare , 1978 single work novel
Introduction Monica Clare , 1978 single work criticism
— Appears in: Karobran : The Story of an Aboriginal Girl 1978; (p. xi-xiii)
The introduction describes Monica Clare's life experiences of growing up as an adoptee as well as the events that took place later in her life during her first marriage. As an Aboriginal activist she was particulary interested in assimilatory practices both personally and politically. Clare also faced problems of identity problems that led her to committing herself to tireless work in the quest for political and social equality. Her honesty and strong principles enabled her to become a well respected and loved member of both the black and white community.Clare died suddenly on National Aborigines Day, 13th July, 1973.
Troubled Canadian Gazing : Aboriginal Women's Lifestorytelling, Multicultural Nationalism, and the Australian-Canadian Comparative Model Jennifer Kelly , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Balayi , vol. 2 no. 1 2001; (p. 137-167)
In this article, Jennifer Kelly is 'concerned in particular with how the Australian-Canadian comparative model constrains the analysis of the diverse nationalist aspirations of the multiple Aboriginal nations whose territories are overlain by Canada and Australia' (138). In her analysis, Kelly draws on numerous Aboriginal women's life writing texts from both Australia and Canada.
Postcard from Monica Clare : 'It was Like This for Most of Us. That's How it Was, and That's How it is for Aboriginal Kids' Monica Clare , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History 2009; (p. 148-149)
In this postcard, Jennifer Jones poses a question. What hope did Monica Clare, the first Aboriginal female novelist, have of getting her message about forced removal across to white readers?
Invisible Workers : The Posthumous Editing of Monica Clare's Karobran Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History 2009; (p. 150-175)
Monica Clare's autobiography Karobran was published posthumously. In this chapter, Jennifer Jones examines the editorial process after Monica's death and how this impacted on the original spirit and intent of the author's message regarding Aboriginal issues.
Literary Links : Monica Clare and Left-Wing Politics Jennifer Jones , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Black Writers White Editors : Episodes of Collaboration and Compromise in Australian Publishing History 2009; (p. 176-205)
In this chapter, Jennifer Jones examines how the conventional treatment by editors led Aboriginal female authors, such as Clare, into positions that compromised the political, marginal and controversial positons adopted in their works.
Last amended 25 Oct 2019 14:03:09
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