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y separately published work icon Lucinda Brayford single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1946... 1946 Lucinda Brayford
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Lucinda Brayford (1946) chronicles three generations of an Anglo-Australian family around the turn of the twentieth century and contrasts both Australian and English societies. At the same time, the book is a sensitive study of one woman's life. Lucinda's family, originally arriving in Australia in disgrace, become wealthy though farming, eventually owning a magnificent house in Toorak where the cream of Melbourne society gathers for social events. Lucinda meets Captain Hugo Brayford and they marry and leave for England where her marriage fails. A life of ease and wealth in Melbourne is replaced by hardship and austerity in wartime England. Some of the anti-authoritarianism and pacifism that emerged from Martin Boyd's experiences in World War I can be seen in this book, considered by some to be his finest work. (Source: Sydney University Press)

Adaptations

form y separately published work icon Lucinda Brayford Cliff Green , ( dir. John Gauci ) Australia : ABC Television , 1980 Z1037663 1980 series - publisher film/TV

The life of Australian socialite Lucinda Brayford from ages eighteen to forty-nine, and her relationships with the men in her lives: old family friend Toby, philandering husband Hugo, lover Pat, and son Stephen. Each episode of the four-part series concentrates on the developing relationship with one of these four men. The series begins in Melbourne but takes place largely in England, following Lucinda's marriage.

Interviewed for the Australian Women's Weekly, producer Oscar Whitbread noted, 'Australia's society, especially Melbourne' aristocracy, has never really been properly depicted on television. [...] The ultra rich ARE different. Lucinda Brayford is an accurate portrayal of the 'beautiful people' as they existed 50 years ago, with all their elegance and impeccable manners' (Wed. 11 June 1980, p.138S).

Further reference:

'Lovely Lucinda–and the Men in her Life'. Australian Women's Weekly Wed. 11 June 1980, p.138S.

'The Story of Lucinda Brayford: Four Loves from a Bygone Era Inspire $1M Series'. Australian Women's Weekly Wed. 16 April 1980, pp.10-11.

y separately published work icon Lucinda Brayford Elspeth Sandys , United Kingdom (UK) : British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) , 2005 8158699 2005 series - publisher radio play historical fiction

A three-part radio adaptation of Lucinda Brayford, adapted for radio by Elspeth Sandys.

Notes

  • Adapted for the 1980 film Lucinda Brayford.
  • Also published in braille and sound recording formats.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Cresset Press ,
      1946 .
      image of person or book cover 2844095146997391721.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 546p.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books ,
      1954 .
      Extent: 505p.
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Lansdowne , 1969 .
      Extent: 546p.
      Reprinted: 1980 2nd impression
      ISBN: 0701801204
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1985 .
      Extent: 546p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduced by Dorothy Green.
      ISBN: 0140072314
Language: Swedish
    • Stockholm,
      c
      Sweden,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Forum ,
      1948 .
      Extent: 500p.

Works about this Work

Always the Feeling of Australia in the Air : Martin Boyd's Lucinda Brayford Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 165-186)
‘”My inner division, if I have one, is the age-long one of the European, between Mediterranean and the north.” With this uncompromising sentence the novelist Martin Boyd (1893-1972) elided Australia from his own history. He repudiated the assumption that expatriation was significant to him because, quite simply, it was not his condition. We note Boyd’s personal geographical orientation. He sees the “division” entirely from the perspective of a European. Australians, it implies, may have issues of identity, but deciding whether their spiritual homeland is north or south of the Alps cannot be one of them.’ (Author’s introduction 165)
The Dear Old Mother Country : Richardson's the Way Home and Stead's For Love Alone Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 133-163)
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

y separately published work icon Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 Peter Morton , New York (City) : Palgrave Macmillan , 2011 Z1826218 2011 single work criticism

'Long before the post-WWII migration, over one hundred Australian writers left their homeland to seek fame and fortune in London. Some made little mark despite their arduous efforts; some made a tolerable living; a few, like Martin Boyd, H.H. Richardson and Christina Stead, actually achieved permanent fame. Lusting for London analyses how these writers reacted to their new surroundings—in both their autobiographical writings and their creative work. With wit and rigor, Peter Morton studies the expatriate experience and reveals the ways in which the loss of these expatriates affected the evolving literary culture of Australia' (Publisher blurb).

Contents: Issues of Definition and Evidence; Sailing for El Dorado: Going Home in the Literary Imagination; A Gout of Bile: Metic and Immigrant Expatriates; The Aroma of the Past: in Antipodean London; Drawing off the Rich Cream: The Struggle in London; Who Are You? No One: The Hacking Journalist in London; The Dear Old Mother Country: Richardson's The Way Home and Stead's For Love Alone; Always the Feeling of Australia in the Air: Martin Boyd's Lucinda Brayford; A Leaven of Venturesome Minds: Literary Expatriates and Australian Culture; No More Pap from the Teats of London: From Expatriation toTtransnationalism; Conclusion: A Padded Cell in Wagga Wagga.

The Outlook and Morals of an Ancient Greek Robert Darby , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 193 2008; (p. 55-59)
Reissues : Not So neglected Boyd Laurie Clancy , 1985 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 74 1985; (p. 35-36)

— Review of Such Pleasure Martin Boyd , 1949 single work novel ; Lucinda Brayford Martin Boyd , 1946 single work novel
Untitled Charles Marriott , 1946 single work review
— Appears in: Manchester Guardian , 27 December 1946; (p. 3)

— Review of Lucinda Brayford Martin Boyd , 1946 single work novel
Untitled 1946 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 28 December 1946; (p. 641)

— Review of Lucinda Brayford Martin Boyd , 1946 single work novel
Untitled Walter Allen , 1947 single work review
— Appears in: The Spectator , 10 January 1947; (p. 56-58)

— Review of Lucinda Brayford Martin Boyd , 1946 single work novel
Untitled Richard Church , 1947 single work review
— Appears in: John O'London's Weekly , 10 January 1947; (p. 201)

— Review of Lucinda Brayford Martin Boyd , 1946 single work novel
Divided Novelist : Martin Boyd (1893-1972) Michael Bardwell , 1995 single work biography
— Appears in: London Magazine , April-May vol. 35 no. 1-2 1995; (p. 70-76)
Dubious Cartography Martin Boyd , Louis Kahan (illustrator), 1964 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , March vol. 23 no. 1 1964; (p. 4-13) On Native Grounds : Australian Writing from Meanjin Quarterly 1967; (p. 95-104)
Lucinda Brayford : Martin Boyd (1893-1972) Jane Gleeson-White , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Classics : Fifty Great Writers and Their Celebrated Works 2007; (p. 118-122)
The Outlook and Morals of an Ancient Greek Robert Darby , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 193 2008; (p. 55-59)
The Search for a Colonial Metropolis : Martin Boyd and the Myth of the Noble Settler Frank Davidson , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Populous Places : Australian Cities and Towns 1992; (p. 166-175)
Last amended 12 Apr 2017 12:28:49
Settings:
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • c
    Australia,
    c
  • 1890s
  • 1900s
  • 1910s
  • 1920s
  • 1930s
  • 1940s
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