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Space Between single work   poetry   "Space between lip and lip"
Issue Details: First known date: 1973... 1973 Space Between
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Alive : Poems 1971-72 Judith Wright , Cremorne : Angus and Robertson , 1973 Z565913 1973 selected work poetry Cremorne : Angus and Robertson , 1973 pg. 21
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon A Human Pattern : Selected Poems Judith Wright , North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990 Z9022 1990 selected work poetry (taught in 3 units)

    'Judith Wright's own definitive selection of her poetry, covering the best and most memorable of her remarkable oeuvre.

    'From the elegant and moving precision of the first collection, The Moving Image (1946), to the political passion of Phantom Dwelling (1985), Wright's poetry speaks with intelligence and courage - and gracefully sensuous imagery.

    'Forty years of poetic production from Australia's best-loved poet.' (Publication summary)

    North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990
    pg. 165-166
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Collected Poems 1942-1985 Judith Wright , Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1994 Z501989 1994 selected work poetry war literature satire (taught in 8 units) Pymble : Angus and Robertson , 1994 pg. 314-315
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Bridgings : Readings in Australian Women's Poetry Rose Lucas (editor), Lyn McCredden (editor), South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 Z219096 1996 anthology poetry criticism extract South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 pg. 8-9

Works about this Work

A Climate of Hope Bill Ashcroft , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November vol. 17 no. 2017; (p. 19-34)

Postcolonial ecocriticism has emerged gradually over the last couple of decades as the differences between postcolonialism and environmentalism have been overcome. Those differences have centred on an assumed conflict in the way the two discourses see the world. However, the colonial roots of environmental degradation and the growing postcolonial critique of the effects of imperialism have seen a growing alliance focused in the discipline of postcolonial ecocriticism. Postcolonial critique and environmentalism have found common interest in the role of imperialism and capitalism in the rapidly degrading anthropocene. However critique has not often led to a clear vision of a possible world. This paper suggests a new alliance – between postcolonial critique, environmentalism and utopianism – one that emerges from the postcolonial realisation the no transformation can occur without the hope inspired by a vision of the future. The paper asks what literature can do in an environmental struggle in which colonized peoples environmental struggle in which colonized peoples are among the worst affected. The role of postcolonial literature provides a model for the transformative function of the creative spirit in political resistance. No true resistance can succeed without a vision of change and literature provides the most powerful location of that vision – no transformation can occur unless it is first imagined.

A Climate of Hope Bill Ashcroft , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November vol. 17 no. 2017; (p. 19-34)

Postcolonial ecocriticism has emerged gradually over the last couple of decades as the differences between postcolonialism and environmentalism have been overcome. Those differences have centred on an assumed conflict in the way the two discourses see the world. However, the colonial roots of environmental degradation and the growing postcolonial critique of the effects of imperialism have seen a growing alliance focused in the discipline of postcolonial ecocriticism. Postcolonial critique and environmentalism have found common interest in the role of imperialism and capitalism in the rapidly degrading anthropocene. However critique has not often led to a clear vision of a possible world. This paper suggests a new alliance – between postcolonial critique, environmentalism and utopianism – one that emerges from the postcolonial realisation the no transformation can occur without the hope inspired by a vision of the future. The paper asks what literature can do in an environmental struggle in which colonized peoples environmental struggle in which colonized peoples are among the worst affected. The role of postcolonial literature provides a model for the transformative function of the creative spirit in political resistance. No true resistance can succeed without a vision of change and literature provides the most powerful location of that vision – no transformation can occur unless it is first imagined.

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