AustLit logo
What Became of That Treaty? single work   prose  
Issue Details: First known date: 1988... 1988 What Became of That Treaty?
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Aboriginal Treaty Committee began work early in 1979, on a voluntary basis, to convince the public and politicians of the need for a properly negotiated Treaty with Australian Aborigines. When the Fraser government fell in 1983 and the first Hawke government succeeded it, Labor had made many promises to Aborigines. Many of our supporters believed that these promises would be kept.' (Introduction)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Australian Aboriginal Studies no. 1 1988 Z652240 1988 periodical issue

    'Given the events of the last six months, a blank sheet of paper, and an editorial to write, I am seized with panic. What can I possibly say in 873 words or less? Some reflections then, in no particular order. The words of the song, 'you don't know what you've got till it's gone' are not strictly appropriate. It being the Institute, hasn't, at the time of writing, gone, and we certainly know what we've got—an institution which is unique in the world. We have however, been pushed, once again, into pondering the nature of that uniqueness, and considering what the effect of certain changes would be.' (Editorial introduction)

    1988
    pg. 40-44
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Born of the Conquerors : Selected Essays Judith Wright , Canberra : Aboriginal Studies Press , 1991 Z548979 1991 selected work prose criticism

    'One of Australia's best known poets, Judith Wright, brings together for the first time a selection of twenty-one essays. Her messages about our need to preserve Aboriginal culture and care for the land run through them all.' (Source: Publishers website)

    Canberra : Aboriginal Studies Press , 1991
    pg. 109-116

Works about this Work

Afterword H. C. Coombs , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 1988; (p. 44-45)

'The developments described by Judith Wright in the article above have produced a response in public awareness and in the Australian media which have helped bring the issue of Aboriginal dispossession before many who had previously been uninformed or indifferent. There have been some signs that politicians themselves have felt obliged to respond also if only in the equivocal terminology of "compacts" of uncertain significance. ' (Publication abstract)

Afterword H. C. Coombs , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 1988; (p. 44-45)

'The developments described by Judith Wright in the article above have produced a response in public awareness and in the Australian media which have helped bring the issue of Aboriginal dispossession before many who had previously been uninformed or indifferent. There have been some signs that politicians themselves have felt obliged to respond also if only in the equivocal terminology of "compacts" of uncertain significance. ' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 28 Sep 2017 08:05:22
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X