7312474700400071015.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y A Little Tea, a Little Chat single work   novel  
First known date: 1948 Issue Details: First known date: 1948... 1948 A Little Tea, a Little Chat
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Living on the seamier side of New York in 1941, Robert Grant is a middle-aged man to whom life is a game in which he makes his own rules. This is no more evident than in the pursuit of his only hobby: the search for, seduction and betrayal of women. His targets are always 'easy', the cheaper the better. He is constantly on the lookout for a new face, a new phone number, 'a little tea, a little chat'. While Grant gets a certain thrill from his intrigues, he receives little pleasure - and gives none, until he meets Barbara, the 'blondine', a large, goodlooking but sluttish woman of thirty-two. In Barbara, he meets his match. First published in 1948, "A Little Tea, A Little Chat" provides an irresistible, sardonic commentary on men and women on the make whose sexual appetites wickedly mirror the materialism of twentieth-century America.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: To my friends Aida and Max Kotlarsky.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2016 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, David Malouf , 1948 single work criticism

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Harcourt Brace ,
      1948 .
      7312474700400071015.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 394p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      Note/s:
      • Copyright date.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Virago ,
      1981 .
      7809146539288196677.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 394p.
      Edition info: Reprinted from American first edition.
      Note/s:
      • Introduced by Hilary Bailey
      ISBN: 0860681769
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Virago ,
      1981 .
      6809487304482727763.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 394p.
      Note/s:
      • With a new introduction by Hilary Bailey

        Published August 17th 1981

      ISBN: 9780860681762
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2016 .
      7009823122065131319.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 320p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 3 October 2016
      ISBN: 9781925355727
      Series: y Text Classics Text Publishing (publisher), Melbourne : Text Publishing , 2012- Z1851461 2012 series - publisher novel 'Great books by great Australian storytellers.' (Text website.)
Alternative title: Tout ce que je veux c'est une femme
Language: French
    • Arles,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      B. Coutaz ,
      1990 .
      2267859417753719061.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 502p.
      ISBN: 2877120317

Works about this Work

Fixated on Women and Wealth David Malouf , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1-2 October 2016; (p. 19)
Christina Stead : Her Luck Ann-Marie Priest , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 72 no. 3 2013; (p. 66-78)
'Reality is Monstrous' : Christina Stead's Critique of the Triumphant West in The Puzzleheaded Girl Michael Ackland , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 27 no. 1 2013; (p. 11-17)
Ackland talks about the publishing decline of Christina Stead's career due to her worsening political and economic situation. Midway through the 1960s, Stead's career was perilously poised. For more than a decade nothing new had appeared from her pen. This was a striking hiatus for a writer who previously had been producing novels at a rate of one every two or three year. Here, Ackland attempts first to establish Stead's political position and opinion of the post-war consensus that had emerged in the US before endeavouring to trace the impact of these attitudes on her depictions of contemporary society in The Puzzleheaded Girl.' (Editor's abstract)
'I am Thinking I am Free' : Intransigent Reality Versus Utopian Thought in the Later Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 159-180)
At the midpoint of Christina Stead's first novel, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934), Baruch urges Catherine to "go abroad, if you can... Get a real cause to fight about" (150). In this and subsequent exchanges Baruch emphasizes the need to go beyond symbolic or grandiloquent gestures, to know for instance the actual role of the Kuomintang in China, not merely to pin on its badge, or to side with armed forces, and not just the Salvation Army to scandalize friends (150). The advice was timely for youth struggling to choose between rival ideologies, programs and panacea, in a century which, with hindsight, appears "littered with Utopian schemes" (Hughes 164). At its outset labour and suffragette movements campaigned for greater rights for depressed social groups, while technological advances raised the prospect of a future in which disease and poverty might be banished, fulfilling work and leisure realizable. Then came the successful October Revolution in 1917, which gave Communism a permanent homeland, in which alternatives to democracy and capitalism could be explored. Also the brutal, dehumanizing experience of the Great War led to calls for radical renewal and social reform, for a reshaping of the inner man and his physical environment. During the inter-war years Europe and America witnessed a host of utopian ventures in the cultural and political spheres, from mass-produced furniture and fixtures, to cities of the future like Le Corbusier's "ville radieuse" or Vladimir Tatlin's designs intended to embody Soviet dynamism and dialectical processes, from popularist political movements, such as Upton Sinclair's crusade to end poverty in California and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, to the totalitarian super-states of Hitler and Stalin. Stead was swept up and buffeted by these historical currents, considered rival nostrums, and left a crucial but neglected commentary on many of the great utopian projects of her time, which underpinned her verdict on the contemporary plight of women.' (Author's abstract)
The ‘American Dilemma’: Christina Stead’s Cold War Anatomy Fiona Morrison , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 241-253)

'After a year in New York in 1935-1936, Christina Stead commented that "the whole spirit of New York is opposed to the creative mind". Yet America and Americans became the matter of five of her subsequent novels. After a leftwing Australian background and a number of years in socialist milieus in London and Paris, Stead was an intriguing reader of 1940s America. In her late American work, I'm Dying Laughing (begun 1949, published 1986), Stead became that most precarious of things - a leftwing critic of the Left during the early Cold War. Desire for success and the accompanying fear of failure are thematised by Stead as "the American dilemma" - the contradictory relationship between collective action and individual survival at the heart of American national identity that she saw as no less forceful and tragic for many on the Left.' (Author's abstract)

[Review] A Little Tea, A Little Chat [and] The People with the Dogs A. Duchene , 1981 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 25 September 1981; (p. 1110)

— Review of A Little Tea, a Little Chat Christina Stead 1948 single work novel ; The People with the Dogs Christina Stead 1952 single work novel
[Review] A Little Tea, A Little Chat [and] The People with the Dogs B. Greenwell , 1981 single work review
— Appears in: New Statesman , 21 August 1981; (p. 21)

— Review of A Little Tea, a Little Chat Christina Stead 1948 single work novel ; The People with the Dogs Christina Stead 1952 single work novel
The Scintillating Stead David Malouf , 1982 single work review
— Appears in: The Age Monthly Review , vol. 2 no. 5 1982; (p. 11-12)

— Review of A Little Tea, a Little Chat Christina Stead 1948 single work novel ; Letty Fox, Her Luck Christina Stead 1946 single work novel ; The People with the Dogs Christina Stead 1952 single work novel
The ‘American Dilemma’: Christina Stead’s Cold War Anatomy Fiona Morrison , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 241-253)

'After a year in New York in 1935-1936, Christina Stead commented that "the whole spirit of New York is opposed to the creative mind". Yet America and Americans became the matter of five of her subsequent novels. After a leftwing Australian background and a number of years in socialist milieus in London and Paris, Stead was an intriguing reader of 1940s America. In her late American work, I'm Dying Laughing (begun 1949, published 1986), Stead became that most precarious of things - a leftwing critic of the Left during the early Cold War. Desire for success and the accompanying fear of failure are thematised by Stead as "the American dilemma" - the contradictory relationship between collective action and individual survival at the heart of American national identity that she saw as no less forceful and tragic for many on the Left.' (Author's abstract)

'I am Thinking I am Free' : Intransigent Reality Versus Utopian Thought in the Later Fiction of Christina Stead Michael Ackland , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 159-180)
At the midpoint of Christina Stead's first novel, Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934), Baruch urges Catherine to "go abroad, if you can... Get a real cause to fight about" (150). In this and subsequent exchanges Baruch emphasizes the need to go beyond symbolic or grandiloquent gestures, to know for instance the actual role of the Kuomintang in China, not merely to pin on its badge, or to side with armed forces, and not just the Salvation Army to scandalize friends (150). The advice was timely for youth struggling to choose between rival ideologies, programs and panacea, in a century which, with hindsight, appears "littered with Utopian schemes" (Hughes 164). At its outset labour and suffragette movements campaigned for greater rights for depressed social groups, while technological advances raised the prospect of a future in which disease and poverty might be banished, fulfilling work and leisure realizable. Then came the successful October Revolution in 1917, which gave Communism a permanent homeland, in which alternatives to democracy and capitalism could be explored. Also the brutal, dehumanizing experience of the Great War led to calls for radical renewal and social reform, for a reshaping of the inner man and his physical environment. During the inter-war years Europe and America witnessed a host of utopian ventures in the cultural and political spheres, from mass-produced furniture and fixtures, to cities of the future like Le Corbusier's "ville radieuse" or Vladimir Tatlin's designs intended to embody Soviet dynamism and dialectical processes, from popularist political movements, such as Upton Sinclair's crusade to end poverty in California and Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, to the totalitarian super-states of Hitler and Stalin. Stead was swept up and buffeted by these historical currents, considered rival nostrums, and left a crucial but neglected commentary on many of the great utopian projects of her time, which underpinned her verdict on the contemporary plight of women.' (Author's abstract)
y Christina Stead: The American Years Anita Kristina Segerberg , 1990 Z67027 1990 single work thesis
The Woman Who Loved Men: Christina Stead as Satirist in "A Little Tea, A Little Chat" and "The People with the Dogs" Susan Sheridan , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: World Literature Written in English , Spring vol. 32 no. 1 1992; (p. 2-12)
Learning to Recognize Wicked People: Christina Stead's "A Little Tea, A Little Chat" Elizabeth Perkins , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: World Literature Written in English , Spring vol. 32 no. 1 1992; (p. 13-25)
Last amended 3 Jan 2017 09:23:22
Settings:
  • 1940s
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X