y The Wild Moth single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1924... 1924 The Wild Moth
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Adaptations

form y The Moth of Moonbi Charles Chauvel , ( dir. Charles Chauvel ) Australia : Australian Film Productions , 1926 Z1719800 1926 single work film/TV

'Charles Chauvel's first feature tells the story of a country girl, Dell Ferris (the Moth of Moonbi), drawn to the bright lights of the big city where her inheritance is soon frittered away with high society revelling. A wiser Dell returns to Moonbi Station where she is beset by the cattle rustler Jack Bronson, but finally finds peace and happiness with the faithful head stockman, Tom.

Shot on location in the bush outside Brisbane the film was also made at an improvised studio at the rear of a guest house in the city. Despite cold weather, cast and crew camped out with pack-horses and sheep for fresh meat. This first effort of Chauvel's (he appears in the film in blackface as an Aboriginal stockman) showed signs of the action director's career characteristics. He shot on difficult locations with new acting talent and told an Australian story which gave heroic dimensions to ordinary lives. Scenes of station life are authentic pictures of cattle yards, transportation by train, and the sale yards. The production cost 4400 pounds and was released at the Wintergarden Theatre, Brisbane on 25 January 1926' (National Film and Sound Archive).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Cassell ,
      1924 .
      Extent: 313p.
      Reprinted: 1927 Popular edition

Works about this Work

'We have to learn to love imperially' : Love in Late Colonial and Federation Australian Romance Novels Hsu-Ming Teo , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Popular Romance Studies , vol. 4 no. 2 2014;

'This article explores Australian romance fiction from the 1880s to 1930s to contemplate how Australian women writers conceptualized romantic love, gender relations, marriage, and the role of the romantic couple within the nation and British Empire. It argues that short stories about love and romance novels prior to Australian Federation (1901) tended to be more pessimistic about the outcome of romantic love in the colonies; both male and female writers of love stories were too aware of the hardships that befell women in the colonies, especially along the frontier. After Federation, however, many of the obstacles to love that had developed in the colonial romance persisted, but in the post-Federation romance novel women writers began to imagine that Australian culture, environment, and character – particularly the two heroic national types, the “Australian Girl” and the “Coming Man” – were ultimately sufficient to overcome such obstacles. Thus post-Federation romance novels are more likely to have happy endings. In these romances, a successful marriage between an Australian and a Briton also served the higher purpose of either nation- or empire-building.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Writing from the Contact Zone : Fiction by Early Queensland Women Belinda McKay , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 2 2004; (p. 53-70) Hibiscus and Ti-Tree : Women in Queensland 2009; (p. 30-45)
This paper examines 'some of the ways in which white women novelists also contributed powerfully to shaping the literary imaginative landscape through which Australian readers came to "know" Indigenous people, and the nature of inter-racial contact, in the period before the publication of writing by Indigenous women began to disrupt the textual terrain' (54). The focus is on the writing of women who grew up in rural Queensland and/or used Queensland as settings. The paper concludes that women writers, though presenting themselves as sympathetic and knowledgeable observers and spokespersons for Indigenous people, were 'active participants in the ongoing colonial projects of subjugating Indigenous people and managing perceptions of that process' (68).
Mabel Forrest and the Witch Marie-Louise Ayres , 1996 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Current Tensions : Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference : 6 - 11 July 1996 1996; (p. 76-84)
The Romance of Experience : The Early Twentieth Century Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s 1995; (p. 51-68)
Untitled 1926 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 9 March vol. 2 no. 15 1926; (p. 24)
Two Bush Novels S. H. P. , 1924 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 22 May vol. 45 no. 2310 1924; (p. 2,3)

— Review of The Wild Moth Mabel Forrest 1924 single work novel
Untitled 1924 single work column
— Appears in: Everylady's Journal , 6 June 1924; (p. 429)
Writing from the Contact Zone : Fiction by Early Queensland Women Belinda McKay , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 2 2004; (p. 53-70) Hibiscus and Ti-Tree : Women in Queensland 2009; (p. 30-45)
This paper examines 'some of the ways in which white women novelists also contributed powerfully to shaping the literary imaginative landscape through which Australian readers came to "know" Indigenous people, and the nature of inter-racial contact, in the period before the publication of writing by Indigenous women began to disrupt the textual terrain' (54). The focus is on the writing of women who grew up in rural Queensland and/or used Queensland as settings. The paper concludes that women writers, though presenting themselves as sympathetic and knowledgeable observers and spokespersons for Indigenous people, were 'active participants in the ongoing colonial projects of subjugating Indigenous people and managing perceptions of that process' (68).
Untitled 1926 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 9 March vol. 2 no. 15 1926; (p. 24)
The Romance of Experience : The Early Twentieth Century Susan Sheridan , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s 1995; (p. 51-68)
Mabel Forrest and the Witch Marie-Louise Ayres , 1996 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Current Tensions : Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference : 6 - 11 July 1996 1996; (p. 76-84)
Last amended 25 Aug 2010 15:34:45
Subjects:
  • Bush,
  • Sydney,
  • Queensland,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
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