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Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 Shade
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First line of verse: "it's a Sunday"
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Friendly Street Poets : Twenty-Two Susan McGowan (editor), David Cookson (editor), Adelaide Kent Town : Friendly Street Poets Wakefield Press , 1998 Z377138 1998 anthology poetry

    'The "Friendly Street" philosophy is to include poets who acknowledge the diversity of thoughts on modern social issues and the complexities of today's living, scattered among the delights of life. This is a collection of the best of their poetry in 1997.' (Publication summary)

    Adelaide Kent Town : Friendly Street Poets Wakefield Press , 1998
    pg. 27
First line of verse: "It's Sunday and the sun"
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Friendly Street : New Poets Six Friendly Street : New Poets 6 John De Laine , Alison Manthorpe , Ray R. Tyndale , Adelaide Kent Town : Friendly Street Poets Wakefield Press , 2000 Z950694 2000 selected work poetry

    'John De Laine uses contemporary language and images in poems that require the readers to dig deep within themselves. For those willing, the rewards are there. The soft sweetness of his collection's title is mocked by the tartness of the poems, wherein most relationships are full of tension and hurt, and where introspective moments bring no calm.

    'Alison Manthorpe's poems about the sea and sailors and their people on shore are strong and evocative. She has an acute ear for the rhythms appropriate to the poem's moment. Her poems of observation and memory avoid the trap of mere description. Instead she reflects on and draws from the experiences recorded in the poem.

    'Ray R. Tindale's collection begins with a lush mid-life crisis food-and-seduction sequence that has something in common with an up-market cooking show. Then follows a love-in-the-garden sequence written with similar ease and delight. A group of farm and outback poems are freshly imagined and keenly observed.' (Publication summary)

    Adelaide Kent Town : Friendly Street Poets Wakefield Press , 2000
    pg. 28
    Note: Pages 28 and 29 printed in reverse order.
Last amended 23 Apr 2002 13:48:02
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