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Issue Details: First known date: 1984... 1984 Wild Man of Letters : The Story of P. R. Stephensen
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Admired by D. H. Lawrence and denounced as a traitor during World War II, 'Inky' Stephensen was one of Australia's most remarkable men of letters. His stormy life paralleled the major artistic and political upheavals of the twentieth century. (Source: LibrariesAustralia)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,: University of Queensland Press , 1992 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of UQP
      Alternative title: Inky Stephensen : Wild Man of Letters
      Link: U23345Full text document Digital copy of print publication via Text Queensland.
      Extent: xii, 320p., [16]p. of platesp.
      Edition info: 2nd ed.
      Description: illus., ports
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliography and index.
      ISBN: 0702223891

Works about this Work

Armchair Tourism : The Popularity of Australian Travel Writing Richard White , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 182-202)
'Richard White examines the 'uneasy relationship' between the genre of travel writing and the notions of the popular. He considers the way in which 'Australian travel writers negotiated the pitfalls of popularity' and argues that 'a number of Australian writers broke with these conventions and willingly embraced the popular.' He takes Frank Clune and Colin Simpson as case studies to examine how their writing courted a popular mass market in Australia and created a genre where ordinary tourist was hero.' (Editor's foreword xiv)
Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Australian Biography and Autobiography Gillian Whitlock , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 165-179)
Whitlock explores the richness of Australian biography and autobiography, as it relates to the dynamics of a settler colony.
The Mandrake Press Booklet Michael Taffe , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Biblionews and Australian Notes and Queries , September - December no. 367 - 368 2010; (p. 84-89)

'Most from the Victorian branch of the BCSA who know me are aware of my preoccupation with PR (Inky) Stephensen's Mandrake Press. As far back as 1985 Professor Reg Carr maintained that this press and its limited liability successor were 'almost entirely neglected.' While paying tribute to Craig Munro's biography of Stephensen, Carr also acknowledged the well documented history of Fanfrolico Press from which Mandrake Press grew. John Arnold's 2009 monograph and comprehensive bibliography, The Fanfrolico Press: Satyrs, Fauns and Fine Books, has confirmed the place of Fanfrolico in the pantheon of early twentieth century fine and private presses.' (from author's introduction p. 84)

The Inky Way John K. Ruffels , 1997 single work biography
— Appears in: Rananim : The Journal of the D.H. Lawrence Society of Australia , September vol. 5 no. 2 1997; (p. 12-16)
On Being Australian : Reflections on Recent Biography James Walter , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 45 no. 4 1986; (p. 479-487)

— Review of Wild Man of Letters : The Story of P. R. Stephensen Craig Munro , 1984 single work biography ; The Archibald Paradox : A Strange Case of Authorship Sylvia Lawson , 1987 single work criticism
Review examines 7 works in all; 2 of these are within Austlit scope
Sydney Life in the Roaring Twenties S. K. Kelen , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 9 January 1993; (p. C6)

— Review of The Sea Coast of Bohemia : Literary Life in Sydney's Roaring Twenties Peter Kirkpatrick , 1992 single work criticism ; Wild Man of Letters : The Story of P. R. Stephensen Craig Munro , 1984 single work biography
Biography Traces 'Inky's' Adventures Pearl Bowman , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 7 no. 1 1993; (p. 82)

— Review of Wild Man of Letters : The Story of P. R. Stephensen Craig Munro , 1984 single work biography
Untitled Hugh Lunn , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , March vol. 5 no. 1 1993; (p. 84-85)

— Review of Wild Man of Letters : The Story of P. R. Stephensen Craig Munro , 1984 single work biography
Untitled Ross Fitzgerald , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: Imago : New Writing , March vol. 5 no. 1 1993; (p. 85-86)

— Review of Wild Man of Letters : The Story of P. R. Stephensen Craig Munro , 1984 single work biography
The Mandrake Press Booklet Michael Taffe , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Biblionews and Australian Notes and Queries , September - December no. 367 - 368 2010; (p. 84-89)

'Most from the Victorian branch of the BCSA who know me are aware of my preoccupation with PR (Inky) Stephensen's Mandrake Press. As far back as 1985 Professor Reg Carr maintained that this press and its limited liability successor were 'almost entirely neglected.' While paying tribute to Craig Munro's biography of Stephensen, Carr also acknowledged the well documented history of Fanfrolico Press from which Mandrake Press grew. John Arnold's 2009 monograph and comprehensive bibliography, The Fanfrolico Press: Satyrs, Fauns and Fine Books, has confirmed the place of Fanfrolico in the pantheon of early twentieth century fine and private presses.' (from author's introduction p. 84)

Australian Biography and Autobiography Gillian Whitlock , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 165-179)
Whitlock explores the richness of Australian biography and autobiography, as it relates to the dynamics of a settler colony.
Armchair Tourism : The Popularity of Australian Travel Writing Richard White , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 182-202)
'Richard White examines the 'uneasy relationship' between the genre of travel writing and the notions of the popular. He considers the way in which 'Australian travel writers negotiated the pitfalls of popularity' and argues that 'a number of Australian writers broke with these conventions and willingly embraced the popular.' He takes Frank Clune and Colin Simpson as case studies to examine how their writing courted a popular mass market in Australia and created a genre where ordinary tourist was hero.' (Editor's foreword xiv)
Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Three Editors and the Status Quo Dorothy Green , 1985 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 44 no. 2 1985; (p. 193-208)
Last amended 28 Aug 2012 09:57:55
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