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Issue Details: First known date: 1981... 1981 Prose-Verse- Poster-Algebraic- Symbolico-Riddle Musicopoematographo-Scope & Pocket MusicopoematographoscopeMusicopoematographoscopes
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Hale and Iremonger , 1981 .
      Description: v, 34p
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Axel Clark.
      • Facsimile of two previously unpublished manuscripts
      ISBN: 0908094884

Works about this Work

Barbecued Sunrise Stephanie Guest , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 18 2018;

'This essay argues for an expanded definition of the category of ‘Australian Literature’ by analysing work at its fringes: experimental literary translation by Australian, English-language, writers. While considerable attention has been given to translation as a mode of literary circulation and as a metaphor for an ethics of cross-cultural exchange, there has been little work done by proponents of World Literature on the linguistic problem of what happens in translation. By contrast, this essay develops a mode of close reading, via theories of transnationalism and translation, applied to two playful translations of Stéphane Mallarmé’s ‘Un coup de dés jamais n’abolira le hasard’ (1895) by Christopher Brennan (1897) and Chris Edwards (2005).' (Publication abstract)

Unsettling the Field : Christopher Brennan and Biodiversity Michael Farrell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'In this paper I consider the ecological term 'biodiversity' as a metaphor within that of the more generally metaphorical term 'field', specifically in relation to Christopher Brennan's work the Musicopoematographoscope. The term 'field', in the literary context may not preclude, but does not suggest biodiversity: suggesting rather evenness, tamedness, industry, fighting or sport - and settledness. I use the ecological figure of biodiversity not as an indication of a relation between writing (poetry) and natural environments per se, but to signal an attention to survival. A literature that can be compared to a biodiverse ecosystem - rather than a field - suggests the wholeness that health is derived from. I draw on and critique the work of American poet Charles Olson and English critic Jonathan Bate.' (Author's abstract)
"A Fluke? [N]ever!" : Reading Chris Edwards Kate Fagan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This paper investigates the use of collage, mimicry and hieroglyphics by the innovative Australian poet Chris Edwards in his latest book of poetry, People of Earth (Vagabond Press, 2011). With scissors in hand, Edwards goes hunting for Jacques Derrida's "non-phonetic functions" and "operative silences of alphabetic writing", those poetical score-marks that are neither "factual accident nor waste" (Derrida, 'The Pit and the Pyramid'), but rather, endlessly renewable resources. The collagist is a recycler and composter, and also a compositor - a filmic sculptor who tricks visual fragments into new entities. Edwards is a deft and seamless crafter, often producing grammatically flawless collages whose motion from scene to scene is subtle and kaleidoscopic. An appendix to People of Earth compiles hundreds of texts that are sources for Edwards' poems. They are a gentle invitation to detective work, but mostly, a museum of tools tended by a fastidious drafter. This paper will explore the radical materialism of Chris Edwards while invoking along the way the ghosts of Christopher Brennan, Charlie Chaplin, Stéphane Mallarmé and Charles Olson.
Untitled Richard Blair , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: Biblionews and Australian Notes and Queries , September - December no. 371 2011; (p. 130-131)
Untitled J. Stone , 1982 single work review
— Appears in: Biblionews and Australian Notes & Queries , vol. 7 no. 2 1982; (p. 45-46) Biblionews and Australian Notes and Queries , September - December no. 371 2011; (p. 132-133)

— Review of Prose-Verse- Poster-Algebraic- Symbolico-Riddle Musicopoematographo-Scope & Pocket MusicopoematographoscopeMusicopoematographoscopes Christopher Brennan , 1981 selected work poetry
Brennan's Tinker's Damn John Tranter , 1982 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 January 1982; (p. 40) Jacket , April no. 29 2006;

— Review of Prose-Verse- Poster-Algebraic- Symbolico-Riddle Musicopoematographo-Scope & Pocket MusicopoematographoscopeMusicopoematographoscopes Christopher Brennan , 1981 selected work poetry
Untitled Paul Hasluck , 1982 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , June vol. 27 no. 2 1982; (p. 96-98)

— Review of Prose-Verse- Poster-Algebraic- Symbolico-Riddle Musicopoematographo-Scope & Pocket MusicopoematographoscopeMusicopoematographoscopes Christopher Brennan , 1981 selected work poetry
Untitled J. Stone , 1982 single work review
— Appears in: Biblionews and Australian Notes & Queries , vol. 7 no. 2 1982; (p. 45-46) Biblionews and Australian Notes and Queries , September - December no. 371 2011; (p. 132-133)

— Review of Prose-Verse- Poster-Algebraic- Symbolico-Riddle Musicopoematographo-Scope & Pocket MusicopoematographoscopeMusicopoematographoscopes Christopher Brennan , 1981 selected work poetry
Untitled Richard Blair , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: Biblionews and Australian Notes and Queries , September - December no. 371 2011; (p. 130-131)
"A Fluke? [N]ever!" : Reading Chris Edwards Kate Fagan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This paper investigates the use of collage, mimicry and hieroglyphics by the innovative Australian poet Chris Edwards in his latest book of poetry, People of Earth (Vagabond Press, 2011). With scissors in hand, Edwards goes hunting for Jacques Derrida's "non-phonetic functions" and "operative silences of alphabetic writing", those poetical score-marks that are neither "factual accident nor waste" (Derrida, 'The Pit and the Pyramid'), but rather, endlessly renewable resources. The collagist is a recycler and composter, and also a compositor - a filmic sculptor who tricks visual fragments into new entities. Edwards is a deft and seamless crafter, often producing grammatically flawless collages whose motion from scene to scene is subtle and kaleidoscopic. An appendix to People of Earth compiles hundreds of texts that are sources for Edwards' poems. They are a gentle invitation to detective work, but mostly, a museum of tools tended by a fastidious drafter. This paper will explore the radical materialism of Chris Edwards while invoking along the way the ghosts of Christopher Brennan, Charlie Chaplin, Stéphane Mallarmé and Charles Olson.
Unsettling the Field : Christopher Brennan and Biodiversity Michael Farrell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'In this paper I consider the ecological term 'biodiversity' as a metaphor within that of the more generally metaphorical term 'field', specifically in relation to Christopher Brennan's work the Musicopoematographoscope. The term 'field', in the literary context may not preclude, but does not suggest biodiversity: suggesting rather evenness, tamedness, industry, fighting or sport - and settledness. I use the ecological figure of biodiversity not as an indication of a relation between writing (poetry) and natural environments per se, but to signal an attention to survival. A literature that can be compared to a biodiverse ecosystem - rather than a field - suggests the wholeness that health is derived from. I draw on and critique the work of American poet Charles Olson and English critic Jonathan Bate.' (Author's abstract)
The Unknown Brennan Lloyd James Austin , 1982 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , April vol. 26 no. 4 1982; (p. 51-53)
Barbecued Sunrise Stephanie Guest , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 18 2018;

'This essay argues for an expanded definition of the category of ‘Australian Literature’ by analysing work at its fringes: experimental literary translation by Australian, English-language, writers. While considerable attention has been given to translation as a mode of literary circulation and as a metaphor for an ethics of cross-cultural exchange, there has been little work done by proponents of World Literature on the linguistic problem of what happens in translation. By contrast, this essay develops a mode of close reading, via theories of transnationalism and translation, applied to two playful translations of Stéphane Mallarmé’s ‘Un coup de dés jamais n’abolira le hasard’ (1895) by Christopher Brennan (1897) and Chris Edwards (2005).' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 23 Feb 2012 14:58:02
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