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Issue Details: First known date: 1986... 1986 National Fictions : Literature, Film and the Construction of Australian Narrative
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'National Fictions is a study of Australian literature and film. It is also a study of Australian culture, viewing the novels and films as products of a specific culture; as narratives with similar structures, functions, forms and meanings. It covers a range of texts, offering both close analysis and an account of their place within the system of meanings dominant in Australian culture.' (Publication summary)

Contents

* Contents derived from the St Leonards, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,:Allen and Unwin , 1993 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Australian Context : Nature and Society, Graeme Turner , 1993 single work criticism (p. 25-53)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 1986 .
      image of person or book cover 7914156709944904481.jpg
      Image courtesy of Allen & Unwin
      Extent: vii, 156pp.
      Description: illus., ports
      Note/s:
      • Includes index and biography.
      ISBN: 0048000884 (pbk.), 0048000892
    • St Leonards, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 1993 .
      Extent: xiv, 169pp.
      Edition info: 2nd Ed.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Includes index and bibliography.
      ISBN: 1863735046

Works about this Work

Redrawing the Map : An Interdisciplinary Geocritical Approach to Australian Cultural Narratives Peta Mitchell , Jane Stadler , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Geocritical Explorations : Space, Place, and Mapping in Literary and Cultural Studies 2011; (p. 47-62)
Nation, Narration and Translation : the Construction of an Australian Literary Archive in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-13)
'The cultural capital attached to the Australian literary archive reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically 'constrained and enabled' by national literary institutions (Dixon 2005). The body of Australian texts which, through translation, is made available to the Italian readership constitutes an extension of that national archive which is shaped by another set of dynamics - both cultural and economic - that further constrain those selections. Pierre Bourdieu's theory of cultural production foregrounds the role of socio-cultural agencies in the production of texts and provides the framework for my recent research into the selection, translation and publication of Australian texts translated into Italian between 1945 and 2006. In this article I examine how in this period the selection of Australian texts for translation into Italian was 'constrained' by agencies in the target culture and also offer some insight into the manner in which Australian cultural institutions influenced that process. By foregrounding the role of socio-cultural agencies in the selection of Australian titles for translation, this article acknowledges the complexity of the relationship between translated literature as cultural artefact and as commodity, stresses the interconnectedness between texts and society, and suggests how this has contributed to shaping the archive of Australian texts in Italian.' (Author's abstract)
The Haunting of Settler Australia : Kate Grenville's The Secret River Sheila Collingwood-Whittick , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 125-142)
In this essay, Sheila Collingwood-Whittick states: 'Kate Grenville's The Secret River, an elegantly-written, meticulously-crafted and extremely readable novel, provides a classic example of white Australian anxiety and ambivalence over the nation's origins. More significantly perhaps, and in direct contradiction with the author's declarations about her book, The Secret River is paradigmatic both of the difficulty settler descendants have in facing some of the grim truths of colonial history, and of their consequent inability to exorcise the ghosts that haunt the national conscience.' (p. 126)
Building on Gendered Ground: Space and National Identity in Brenda Walker’s The Wing of Night Laura White , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing , May no. 1 2010; (p. 4-13)

'On Anzac Day 2005 John Howard proclaimed that Anzac soldiers had 'bequeathed Australia a lasting sense of national identity'. Howard's speeches and other efforts to revitalise Anzac Day have generated questions about his vision of the Australian nation...

Brenda Walker's award winning fourth novel The Wing of Night entered this debate about the control and uses of the Anzac image in 2005, the year that marked the 90th anniversary of the Anzac landing at Gallipoli. By honouring and remembering a variety of men and women that Howard's version of the Anzac legend ignores, Walker challenges a limited, gendered image of the nation.' (p. 1)
Landscape and Australian Fiction Susan K. Martin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 41-49)
'Susan Martin's essay... considers the central role played in Australian literature and its criticism by ideas about the land and environment, from colonial images of conquering or domesticating the land, to the heroic or anti-heroic ideas of nation-forming bush, to the increasing sense of an Aboriginal land, to new postcolonial forms of spatial history and contemporary eco-criticism.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
National Fiction Sam Rohdie , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media and Cultural Studies , vol. 1 no. 1 1987;

— Review of National Fictions : Literature, Film and the Construction of Australian Narrative Graeme Turner , 1986 single work criticism
When Australia Became Modern Toby Miller , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: Continuum : The Australian Journal of Media & Culture , vol. 8 no. 2 1994;

— Review of National Fictions : Literature, Film and the Construction of Australian Narrative Graeme Turner , 1986 single work criticism
Prison without Bars : Telling the Past John Slavin , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , July no. 92 1987; (p. 12-13)

— Review of National Fictions : Literature, Film and the Construction of Australian Narrative Graeme Turner , 1986 single work criticism
Untitled Reviews D. M. Roskies , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , November vol. 1 no. 2 1987; (p. 120)

— Review of National Fictions : Literature, Film and the Construction of Australian Narrative Graeme Turner , 1986 single work criticism
Untitled Veronica Brady , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , September vol. 32 no. 3 1987; (p. 89-93)

— Review of National Fictions : Literature, Film and the Construction of Australian Narrative Graeme Turner , 1986 single work criticism
Landscape and Australian Fiction Susan K. Martin , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 41-49)
'Susan Martin's essay... considers the central role played in Australian literature and its criticism by ideas about the land and environment, from colonial images of conquering or domesticating the land, to the heroic or anti-heroic ideas of nation-forming bush, to the increasing sense of an Aboriginal land, to new postcolonial forms of spatial history and contemporary eco-criticism.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Building on Gendered Ground: Space and National Identity in Brenda Walker’s The Wing of Night Laura White , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Australian Writers and Writing , May no. 1 2010; (p. 4-13)

'On Anzac Day 2005 John Howard proclaimed that Anzac soldiers had 'bequeathed Australia a lasting sense of national identity'. Howard's speeches and other efforts to revitalise Anzac Day have generated questions about his vision of the Australian nation...

Brenda Walker's award winning fourth novel The Wing of Night entered this debate about the control and uses of the Anzac image in 2005, the year that marked the 90th anniversary of the Anzac landing at Gallipoli. By honouring and remembering a variety of men and women that Howard's version of the Anzac legend ignores, Walker challenges a limited, gendered image of the nation.' (p. 1)
Rock Wallabies and Mayan Temples : The Landscapes of the Pilbara in Japanese Story and the Burrup Penninsula Delys Bird , 2007-2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Zeitschrift fur Australienstudien , no. 21-22 2007-2008; (p. 21-28)
The Haunting of Settler Australia : Kate Grenville's The Secret River Sheila Collingwood-Whittick , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 125-142)
In this essay, Sheila Collingwood-Whittick states: 'Kate Grenville's The Secret River, an elegantly-written, meticulously-crafted and extremely readable novel, provides a classic example of white Australian anxiety and ambivalence over the nation's origins. More significantly perhaps, and in direct contradiction with the author's declarations about her book, The Secret River is paradigmatic both of the difficulty settler descendants have in facing some of the grim truths of colonial history, and of their consequent inability to exorcise the ghosts that haunt the national conscience.' (p. 126)
Nation, Narration and Translation : the Construction of an Australian Literary Archive in Italian Denise Maree Formica , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-13)
'The cultural capital attached to the Australian literary archive reflects those nation-specific values and discourses that have been historically 'constrained and enabled' by national literary institutions (Dixon 2005). The body of Australian texts which, through translation, is made available to the Italian readership constitutes an extension of that national archive which is shaped by another set of dynamics - both cultural and economic - that further constrain those selections. Pierre Bourdieu's theory of cultural production foregrounds the role of socio-cultural agencies in the production of texts and provides the framework for my recent research into the selection, translation and publication of Australian texts translated into Italian between 1945 and 2006. In this article I examine how in this period the selection of Australian texts for translation into Italian was 'constrained' by agencies in the target culture and also offer some insight into the manner in which Australian cultural institutions influenced that process. By foregrounding the role of socio-cultural agencies in the selection of Australian titles for translation, this article acknowledges the complexity of the relationship between translated literature as cultural artefact and as commodity, stresses the interconnectedness between texts and society, and suggests how this has contributed to shaping the archive of Australian texts in Italian.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 25 Feb 2014 13:52:21
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