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Dublin and the Bush single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1943... 1943 Dublin and the Bush
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Works about this Work

The Harp in the South : Reading Ireland in Australia Patrick Buckridge , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford History of the Irish Book, Volume V 2011; (p. 440-461)

'The Australian branch of the modern Irish diaspora has several apparently distinctive features, when compared with the British, American and Canadian branches. As explained by the historian Oliver MacDonagh, these include, firstly, its large size in relation to the total population – over 30% in the eastern mainland states, and sustained at that level down to the First World War and beyond; secondly, its unusually uniform distribution around the country, geographically, socially and even occupationally, with relatively strong Irish presences in all states, and in all classes and occupations (except the higher financial professions), but notably the law, politics, journalism and teaching; and thirdly their unique position within the diaspora,as a founding people, arriving at the beginning of European settlement (mainly as convicts and soldiers), and thereby staking a claim, and an interest, in the shape and destiny of the nation as a whole.' (Author's introduction)

The Harp in the South : Reading Ireland in Australia Patrick Buckridge , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford History of the Irish Book, Volume V 2011; (p. 440-461)

'The Australian branch of the modern Irish diaspora has several apparently distinctive features, when compared with the British, American and Canadian branches. As explained by the historian Oliver MacDonagh, these include, firstly, its large size in relation to the total population – over 30% in the eastern mainland states, and sustained at that level down to the First World War and beyond; secondly, its unusually uniform distribution around the country, geographically, socially and even occupationally, with relatively strong Irish presences in all states, and in all classes and occupations (except the higher financial professions), but notably the law, politics, journalism and teaching; and thirdly their unique position within the diaspora,as a founding people, arriving at the beginning of European settlement (mainly as convicts and soldiers), and thereby staking a claim, and an interest, in the shape and destiny of the nation as a whole.' (Author's introduction)

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